Vegan Potstickers/Gyoza/Mandu Dumplings: Recipe #214

Many cultures have a filled dumpling kind of food: samosas, empanadas, pierogies, ravioli, mochi, blueberry buns… Maybe we’re on a quest to try them all! In Japan and Korea these marvels are savory and can be filled with veggies like cabbage and mushrooms. They’re fun to cook, steamed on one side and fried on the other side, then dipped in a sesame soy based sauce. All the kids went back for seconds of these vegan potstickers. Hope you enjoy! Thanks to Bianca for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($11 for about 12 gyoza)

Gyoza dough:
2 1/2 cups flour – $0.40
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
2/3 cup hot water – free
Cornstarch to dust

Filling:
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil – $0.40
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped – $0.15
1 tsp ginger – $0.28
1 leek, chopped – $1.49
1 package enoki mushrooms – $2.49
1 head savoy cabbage, chopped – $2.49
1 orange pepper, chopped – $1.69
2 tbsp soy sauce – $0.20
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – $0.27
Salt and pepper to taste

1 tbsp canola oil for cooking – $0.04
1/4 cup water – free

Sauce:
3 tbsp soy sauce – $0.30
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar – $0.27
1 tbsp maple syrup – $0.24
1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil – $0.04

Garnish (optional): tofu, sesame seeds, green onion

Directions for Vegan Potstickers

1. Make the dough: In a medium bowl, mix the flour and salt, then pour in the hot water while stirring until it comes together into a ball of dough. Knead with your hands for 5 minutes, then wrap it in cling wrap and refrigerate for 1/2 hour to 1 hour.

After that, roll it out on a board dusted with cornstarch to a round shape as thin as you can make it. Use a round cookie cutter about 3″ wide to cut out circles that will be used to wrap the dumplings.

2. Make the filling: In a large pan, heat the 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil over medium high heat, then add in the garlic. Cook for 2-3 minutes until the garlic starts to turn golden, then add in the ginger and leeks and cook for 3-5 more minutes to soften the leeks.

Add in the mushrooms, cabbage, and pepper, followed by the 2 tbsp soy sauce and 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar. Cook for 5-7 more minutes until the cabbage is wilted and the liquid is mostly gone. Set aside to cool for the filling stage.

3. Assemble and cook the gyoza: Use your fingers to stretch a wrapper out a little bit more, then add a full teaspoon of filling to the center of the wrapper. Fold the wrapper over the filling like a taco shell, working from one end and pinching the two sides along the edge in a diagonal overlapping pattern (see pictures below), or any pattern you like.

Heat up the canola oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the dumplings and cook for about 3 minutes until they get nice and golden on the bottom, then pour in the 1/4 cup water and cover the pot with a lid. Steam for about 8 minutes until the water has evaporated, then remove the potstickers carefully from the pot with a flapjack (they will be a lovely shade of brown after being nicely stuck to the pan).

Stir the sauce ingredients together, and serve with the gyoza/vegan potstickers, the leftover filling, tofu, and any garnishes you like. Enjoy hot from the pan!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Japanese Milk Bread (Plant-Based): Recipe #209

The overnight rise in this recipe is totally worth the fluffy, soft texture for which Japanese milk bread is known. It’s an unusual, brioche-like bread recipe that starts with making a kind of roux, or thick flour paste, that gets mixed into the rest of the dough as you go. Then it gets finished off with a lovely maple glaze. It’s versatile enough to pair with any soup or stew you like, or to be toasted as part of a sumptuous breakfast. Thanks to Hannah for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($3 for 1 large loaf)

Flour paste:
1/4 cup flour – $0.04
2/3 cup unsweetened soy milk – $0.25

Dough:
1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tsp brown sugar – $0.01
1/3 cup hottest tap water – free
1/3 cup + 3 tbsp soy milk – $0.19
3 cups white + 1/3 cup whole wheat flour (plus extra as needed) – $0.53
1/4 cup brown sugar – $0.13
1 tsp salt – $0.05
3 tbsp Miyoko’s vegan butter, softened – $1.31

Glaze:
1/2 tbsp maple syrup – $0.12
1 tbsp water – free

Directions for Japanese Milk Bread

1. Make the flour paste: in a small pan, mix the flour and soy milk together until smooth. Turn the heat onto medium-low and whisk continuously until you get a thick paste. Remove from heat and cover the surface of the paste with parchment paper, then cool to room temperature.

Next, in a small non-metal bowl, gently mix together the yeast, brown sugar, and hottest tap water. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes to form a thick foam, then stir in the soy milk.

In a large metal bowl, mix together the flours, brown sugar and salt. Add the cooled flour paste and yeast mixture, then stir it until it comes together into a ball of dough. Knead for 10 minutes by hand, adding small amounts of flour if it really sticks to your fingers. The dough will be nice and soft and elastic. Then add the vegan butter and knead for 10 more minutes to thoroughly incorporate the butter into the dough so it’s not oily.

Put the dough in large bowl, cover and leave it in the fridge overnight to rise and double in size.

2. The next day, punch the dough down to release the air, then divide it into 4 pieces. Use a rolling pin to roll each piece out into an oval, then fold the oval in thirds to make a long rectangle (see picture below). Roll out the rectangle to seal the seam, then use your hands to roll it up from one end to make a stubby, tight spiral. Repeat with the other pieces of dough.

Line a loaf pan with parchment paper and put each spiral into the loaf pan with the seam at the bottom. They should be wedged in next to each other nicely. Cover and rise in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours until doubled in size again.

3. After the dough has risen, use a pastry brush to gently coat the top with the maple syrup and water mixture.

Bake at 350F for 30 minutes until it’s nice and dark golden on top, or until a thermometer inserted into the loaf measures over 200F. When it’s ready, remove the bread from the oven, cool it in the loaf pan for 10 minutes, then turn it out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

Pull the sections apart and slice to your desired thickness. Enjoy your Japanese milk bread warm or have it toasted the next day. Freeze any leftovers in a sealed container or bag for future eating!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Lentil Miso Gravy with Seitan, Broccoli, and Quinoa: #185 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

When transitioning to a plant-based diet, it can be helpful to have some meat-like meals to soften the change. This recipe tastes like a rich beef stew, thanks to a hearty lentil miso gravy and some chopped up Field Roast plant-based meat. We enjoyed it for a comforting dinner with baby broccoli over quinoa. Thanks to Isa once again for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($14 total for 6 servings)

Gravy:
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
1/2 large onion, diced – $0.25
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 tsp salt – $0.05
1 tbsp thyme – $0.70
1 tsp sage – $0.28
Pepper to taste
1 1/2 cups cooked lentils – $0.69
2 tbsp red miso – $0.67
1 1/2 tbsp cornstarch – $0.15
1 1/2 cups vegetable broth – free from boiling leftover kale stalks with some herbs

1 package Field Roast frankfurters or sausages (seitan), cut into bite-sized pieces – $6.99
1 cup dry quinoa, cooked according to package directions – $1.00
1 bunch baby broccoli – $2.79

Directions

1. Make the gravy: In a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 5 minutes until soft. Add the salt, thyme, sage, and pepper, followed by the lentils and miso. Stir until well mixed and heated through. Transfer to a blender and process until very smooth.

Dissolve the cornstarch in the vegetable broth and add it back to the pan along with the blended gravy. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently, then turn the heat down and simmer for a few minutes until you get your desired thickness of gravy. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.

2. Add the seitan chunks to the gravy to heat through. Meanwhile, steam the baby broccoli – put a bit of water in the bottom of a Pyrex dish with the broccoli, cover it with the lid and microwave it for about 3 minutes, then let it sit for a few minutes longer to finish cooking. It should be tender but still bright green. Warm up the cooked quinoa.

3. And now for the exciting part! Assemble your bowl with quinoa, baby broccoli, and a good helping of seitan with gravy. Cozy up on the couch with your bowl of warm healing deliciousness. Enjoy on your own or with people you love.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum score!)

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Panda Oreo Cake: #151 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Plant-based desserts are very fun to make and can be even more delicious than ones made with butter – but no judgment at all if you’re a dairy fan. This was a kid-crafted creation at our house, including homemade chocolate sandwich cookies and marshmallowy frosting. We also had to play the song “Panda” from the movie Secret Life of Pets 2 while decorating it. 🙂

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($9 total for the whole cake)

Oreos:
3/4 cup flour – $0.12
1/4 cup + 2 tbsp cocoa – $0.33
1/4 cup + 2 tbsp sugar – $0.25
1/4 tsp salt – $0.02
1/4 tsp baking soda – $0.01
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20
1/4 cup coconut oil – $2.20
3 tbsp soy milk – $0.07
2 tbsp honey – $0.28
1/2 cup powdered sugar – $0.44
1/2 tsp vanilla – $0.10
1/4 cup margarine – $0.62

Cake:
1 cup flour – $0.16
1 cup sugar – $0.88
6 tbsp cocoa – $0.41
1 tsp baking powder – $0.02
3/4 tsp baking soda – $0.01
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
1/2 cup soy milk – $0.18
1/4 cup canola oil – $0.18
1 egg – $0.29
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20
1/2 cup boiling water – free

Frosting:
1 1/2 cups brown sugar – $0.78
2 egg whites – $0.58
6 tbsp water – free
Dash salt – $0.01
2 tsp vanilla – $0.40

Directions

1. Make the oreos: we followed this excellent recipe for healthy vegan oreos from Chocolate Covered Katie.

2. Make the cake: in a medium bowl, stir the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt together. Mix well. Add the soy milk, canola oil, egg, and vanilla and beat with an electric mixer until well combined. Turn the speed down and carefully add in the boiling water, then mix for 1 minute.

Pour the cake batter into two parchment-lined 9″ cake pans (the batter will be very thin but don’t worry). Bake at 350F for 30 minutes. Best chocolate cake ever!

3. Make the frosting and decorate: we followed this yummy fluffy marshmallowy frosting recipe from The Spruce Eats.

Remove the cooled cakes from the pans and slice any bumpy tops off to make flat surfaces. Put some frosting on one cake, then some optional walnuts, then lay the other cake on top. Cover the whole thing with frosting, in any pattern you like, then make a panda face out of the oreos and add any sprinkles or marshmallows or other bits you might have in your kitchen.

Kids or adults can get creative and have fun here, there’s no wrong way to decorate it. 🙂

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Sweet Sheep Cupcakes (Dairy-Free): #144 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

These cupcakes are almost too cute to eat! A little flock of marshmallow sheep with coconut-scented frosting and vegan vanilla cupcakes underneath. Thanks to Rachel Fong for design inspiration and Isa Chandra Moskowitz for cupcake batter ideas.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($17 total for 12 cupcakes)

Cupcakes:
1 cup vanilla soy milk – $0.37
1 tsp apple cider vinegar – $0.11
1 1/4 cups flour – $0.20
2 tbsp cornstarch – $0.20
3/4 tsp baking powder – $0.01
1/2 tsp baking soda – $0.01
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
1/3 cup canola oil – $0.22
3/4 cup sugar – $0.66
2 tsp vanilla – $0.20

Frosting:
1 cup coconut oil – $8.79
3 1/2 cups powdered sugar – $3.08
1 1/2 tsp vanilla – $0.15
1/4 cup vanilla soy milk – $0.09

Decorations:
1/2 cup chocolate chips – $0.25
2 cups mini marshmallows – $0.99
24 whole cashews – $2.00

Directions

1. Make the cupcakes: In a measuring cup, mix the soy milk and apple cider vinegar and sit for a couple of minutes to curdle. In a large bowl, mix the flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together, then add in the canola oil, sugar, vanilla, and curdled soymilk. Stir just until there are no clumps of flour, then pour evenly into 12 lined cupcake tins.

2. Bake the cupcakes and make the frosting: Bake the cupcakes at 350F for 20 minutes, then lift them out of the tin with a blunt knife and cool on a wire rack. Meanwhile, add the coconut oil and powdered sugar to a large bowl and mix together with an electric mixer until smooth. You could also do this by hand if you don’t have an electric mixer. Add the soy milk and vanilla and mix for a couple more minutes to get a nice spreadable texture.

3. Decorate: On each cooled cupcake, spread some frosting evenly over the surface with a blunt knife or spreader. Add cashew ears, place the chocolate chip eyes and nose, and break the mini marshmallows in half to make sheep fluff. Place the sheep fluff marshmallows all over the sheep faces as desired. Get creative and have fun! Warning: if you give cute names to your cupcake sheep (like Sheepy, Peep, and Fluffball), they will be harder to eat. 🙂

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 15

Experiment Outcome: This recipe gets added to our Family Favorites! 🙂

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Teriyaki Tofu Stirfry: #98 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Sometimes a body just wants some veggies, and fast! When you get that craving, this is a great recipe to reach for. Snow peas, mushrooms, tofu, peppers, zucchini, bok choy – really almost any veggies you have on hand would work here. You could make your own teriyaki sauce or buy it premade. 

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($14 total)

1/2 bottle Trader Joe’s Soyaki sauce (or other teriyaki sauce) – $1.85
1 package extra firm tofu, cut into chunks – $3.69
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 orange pepper, diced – $0.99
1 (8 oz) package crimini mushrooms, sliced – $2.49
2 zucchinis, halved and sliced – $0.78
1 (9 oz) package snow peas – $2.29
2 bok choy heads, chopped – $1.99

Directions

1. Marinate the tofu in the teriyaki sauce for at least 20 minutes (can be longer if you cover it and put it in the fridge).

2. Chop up all your veggies! Heat the olive oil over high heat in the biggest pan you have. Cook the garlic first, just for a minute until it starts to turn golden (not dark brown). 

Add the mushrooms, pepper, and zucchini, and stir to cook for about 5 minutes. 

Next add in the snow peas and bok choy, and cook for about 3 more minutes, just until they turn bright green.

Lastly, add in the tofu.

3. Mix everything together thoroughly, and turn the heat down to medium. Cook for about 3 more minutes to bring the tofu up to a nice warm temperature and let the teriyaki sauce get mixed into everything.

Serve immediately and enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum possible score!)

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Baked Teriyaki Salmon and Eggplant: #84 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

I love anything teriyaki, and when the youngest kids are not with us we can venture into acquired tastes like eggplant and salmon, with cabbage-mashed-potatoes on the side. This was a very healing and comforting dinner, without too much prep work. 

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($13 total)

1 lb salmon fillet – $9.59
1 eggplant – $1.39
1/2 bottle Soyaki or teriyaki sauce – $1.85

Directions

1. Pour the teriyaki sauce over the salmon and eggplant, and if you have time, cover and marinate in the fridge for about half an hour or more. Pull the eggplant out of the marinade and bake at 425F for 10 minutes, since the eggplant needs about twice as long in the oven as the salmon. Then pull the salmon out of the marinade, drop the temperature to 400F, and add the salmon to the eggplant baking sheet for 12 minutes more. Make sure to save the marinade for step 2!

2. While things are baking, heat the remaining marinade in a small pot, stirring frequently, to thicken it up into a nice teriyaki glaze.

3. Remove the eggplant and salmon from the oven, cut off individual-sized pieces, and serve with the teriyaki glaze drizzled over top. We also made mashed potatoes with cabbage to go with it.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 1 = wowzers (salmon from Norway)
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Salmon Donburi Rice Bowl: #62 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

My kids love Japanese food. Sushi, chicken teriyaki, bento boxes, rice bowls, you name it. The rice bowl (also knows as donburi) is actually very versatile – you put rice at the bottom, and whatever protein and vegetables you like on top. Here we grilled some marinated salmon and paired it with teriyaki greens.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($15 total)

1 lb salmon fillet – $10.59
2 cups dry rice + 4 cups water – $0.71
1 bag mixed power greens (baby kale, chard, spinach) – $1.99
1/2 bottle teriyaki or Island Soyaki sauce – $1.85
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Marinate the salmon fillet, skin side up, in half of the teriyaki sauce. Cover and put in the fridge for at least 1 hour to let it soak in. 

2. In a medium pot, mix the rice and water and bring to a boil, then lower to minimum heat for 15-20 minutes to let the rice soak up the water. Chop up the greens and stirfry them over medium-high heat covered in the other half of the teriyaki sauce. Stir and cook until wilted and bright green.

3. Grill the salmon on a barbecue or grill (or frying pan) just until it starts to flake apart with a fork and isn’t raw in the middle. Serve over the rice with greens on the side.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 1 = wowzers (salmon from Norway!)
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Sesame Chicken with Soba Noodles: #24 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

“Chicken and sobas, please!” is the frequent answer to “What do you guys want for dinner?” at our house. It’s a spin on a baked chicken dish I had at a retreat once, mixed with a yummy warm soba noodle salad and a side of veggies. Today’s veggies are the British treat of cauliflower cheese.  

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($16 total)

2 lb chicken breast – $6.54
1/4 cup canola oil – $0.37
1/4 cup soy sauce – $0.40
1 tbsp bourbon – $0.30
2 tbsp honey – $0.28
2 tsp garlic powder – $0.56
2 tsp ginger – $0.56
2 tbsp sesame seeds – $0.16
1 8 oz package soba noodles – $2.99
4 tbsp toasted sesame oil – $1.60
6 tbsp soy sauce – $0.60
3 tbsp balsamic vinegar – $0.81
2 tbsp maple syrup – $0.48

Directions

1. Marinate the chicken in the mix of canola oil, soy sauce, bourbon, honey, garlic powder, ginger, and sesame seeds, cover in foil, and let sit for at least 1 hour in the fridge.

Leave foil on chicken and bake in a 350F oven for 20 minutes. Remove the foil, turn the chicken breasts over with a fork, and bake for another 20 minutes without foil. Then turn the chicken breasts over one more time and bake for a final 20 minutes. They should be fully cooked at this point and nicely soaked in juices. Feel free to cut into one if you want to make sure there’s no raw pink inside.

2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil, salt the water if desired, and add the soba noodles. Cook according to package directions (usually about 4 minutes). While it’s cooking, combine the toasted sesame oil, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, and maple syrup in a small bowl.

3. Drain the noodles and mix in the sauce, then put everything on the table and dig in!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  3 = >6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Onigiri Rice Balls: #6 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments


Part of a complete Japanese bento box is a beautiful onigiri, or rice ball. It can be filled with salmon or vegetables, dipped in sesame seeds, or just wrapped in seaweed. Kind of like a sandwich to bring to school or work, but with rice instead of bread.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($1.50 total)

2 cups short-grain Calrose rice – $0.71
2 cups water – free
Salt for rubbing on hands – $0.25
1/2 pack roasted seaweed snack sheets – $0.50

Directions

1. Rinse the rice in a large bowl several times with cold water until the water is almost clear. Then drain the rice in a colander and let it sit for 30 minutes.

Put the drained rice and the water in a pot and let it soak for 30-60 minutes before cooking it.

2. Bring the rice and water to a boil over medium-high heat in a covered pot, then reduce or turn off the heat and let the cooking finish. Once the heat is off, leave the lid on for another 15 minutes, then fluff up the rice with a fork and let it cool.

Wet and rub some salt on your hands, then pick up about 1/2 cup of the rice and pack it into a ball, triangle, or any shape you like. Take a piece of seaweed and wrap it around the rice ball, pressing it to help it stick. This recipe makes 8 balls. Enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!