Chocolate Raspberry Brioche Buns: Recipe #240

These are bites of pure heaven. Chocolate raspberry brioche buns are clouds of fluffy bread stuffed with a single raspberry and a square of chocolate that melt together as they bake. You bite into one and a burst of flavor comes through the soft pillowy brioche. Magical.

We decided to bake instead of fry these, and to put chocolate + raspberry together instead of separating them.

Which brings up a great insight about how to make decisions. If you’re stuck on something, take a moment to sit quietly, be with your breath, and feel your body. Allow yourself to be present with whatever emotions or sensations come up.

Trust that you already know what to do, and trust the decision to reveal itself. It doesn’t have to be the “right” decision. Just pick something, go with it, and learn.

Thanks to Paul for this recipe’s inspiration and to all of you for being part of our delicious, mindful, planet-saving family!

Ingredients ($6.50 for 18 filled buns)

1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tsp brown sugar – $0.01
1/3 cup hot soy milk (heat for 30 seconds in the microwave to reach 140F) – $0.12
1 1/2 cup white flour – $0.24
1/2 cup white whole wheat flour – $0.09
2 tbsp brown sugar – $0.06
3/4 tsp salt – $0.03
2 eggs – $0.58
Knead 10 minutes
1/2 cup Miyoko’s vegan butter, softened – $1.24
Knead 5 minutes
Fridge O/N
16 raspberries – $2.50
16 small-ish chunks of dark chocolate – $1.00
Rise 15 minutes warm place
Soy wash
Bake 350 20 mins

Directions for Chocolate Raspberry Brioche Buns

1. In a small, non-metal bowl, mix the yeast, 1 tsp brown sugar, and warmed soy milk. Stir gently to combine and let it sit for 5 minutes to form a thick foam on top of the liquid.

In a large metal bowl, mix together the flours, 2 tbsp brown sugar, and salt. Mix the eggs into the yeast mixture, then pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Stir with a wooden spoon until it comes together into a ball, then knead by hand for 10 minutes until it’s nice and smooth.

Next, add the vegan butter, squish it in with your hands and enjoy the magnificent sound, then knead for 5 more minutes. It will be lovely and soft, and it’s ok if it’s a bit sticky.

Put the dough into a plastic bowl, cover, and refrigerate overnight.

2. The next morning, put the dough on a lightly floured board and knead it a few times to get the air out. Use a sharp knife to cut it into 18 equal-sized pieces and shape each one into a ball.

Wash and dry your raspberries, and prepare your chocolate chunks. Flatten each ball into a disc, put a chocolate-stuffed raspberry in the middle, and fold the dough up around the raspberry. Pinch the dough together and gently roll it back into a ball, with the surprise nicely tucked inside. Repeat for each of the 18 balls.

Put the stuffed balls on a parchment-lined baking sheet, cover with cling wrap or a damp tea towel, and let them rise in a warm place for 15 minutes.

3. When the buns have doubled in size, brush them with some extra soy milk, then bake at 350F for 16-20 minutes until they’re nice and golden brown.

Cool for a few minutes, then serve your chocolate raspberry brioche buns warm, with plant-based whipped cream and dusted with icing sugar if you like. Celebrate your decision to make these delicious treats! ❤️

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Baked Vegan Beignets: Recipe #233

Beignets are a traditional French or Louisiana breakfast of pillowy fried dough dusted with powdered sugar. We wanted to experiment with a non-fried, plant-based version, so these baked vegan beignets were born. Thank you to Kellie and Meggy for inspiration.

And thank YOU for being part of our delicious, planet-saving family!

Ingredients ($1.50 total for 16 baked vegan beignets)

6 tbsp hot water from the tap (about 130F) – free
1 + 2 tbsp brown sugar – $0.09
3/4 tsp active dry yeast – $0.15
1 vegan “egg” replacement (soak 1 tbsp ground flax seeds + 2 tbsp water in the fridge for 5 minutes) – $0.12
1/4 cup + 4 tsp soy milk – $0.13
2 tbsp melted margarine or vegan butter – $0.31
1/2 tsp vanilla – $0.10
1 cup flour – $0.16
1 cup white whole wheat flour – $0.16
Powdered sugar for dusting – $0.25

Directions

1. In a small non-metal bowl, mix the hot water, 1 tbsp brown sugar, and yeast. Stir gently and allow to sit for 5 minutes to form a layer of foam on top and activate the yeast.

Then mix in the vegan “egg” you prepared (by putting the flax seeds and water in the fridge for 5 minutes to get all thick and gloopy, like an egg). Add the 1/4 cup soy milk to the yeast-flax mixture as well, along with the melted butter and vanilla.

Next, gradually in the flour, mix well with a wooden spoon, and form into a ball of dough. Knead with your hands for 15 minutes until it gets nice and smooth. Place the ball of dough in a metal bowl, cover with a damp tea towel, and let it rise in a warm place for about 1 hour to double in size.

2. When the dough has risen, roll it out on a lightly floured surface to about 1/4″ thick, then use a sharp knife to cut it into 16 pieces of whatever shape you like. We did a combination of square-ish shapes and triangle-ish shapes.

Next, place them on two parchment-lined baking sheets, cover with tea towels, and let them rise in a warm place for about 30-45 minutes to about double again.

After the beignets have risen, gently brush them with the 4 tsp of soy milk, then bake at 375F for 8-10 minutes, until they’re beautifully golden and puffed up.

3. Remove from the oven and serve your baked vegan beignets hot, dusted with powdered sugar or dunked in your coffee or soy milk. They also freeze well for future breakfasts reheated in the toaster, if you have some left. Bon appetit!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Chocolate Almond Veggan Croissants: #199 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

I’ve been afraid of laminated pastry for a while. So many steps, and trips to the fridge, and what if the butter all leaks out into a mess? But Megan was brave enough to take up the challenge, and she made these amazingly flaky, crunchy on the outside, soft on the inside, AND dairy-free croissants with vegan butter and homemade marzipan. I would happily eat these anytime she wants to make them. Thanks to Food52 for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($9 total for 9 mini croissants)

Dough:
1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
2 tbsp brown sugar – $0.06
1/4 cup hottest tap water – free
2 cups flour – $0.32
1 tsp salt – $0.10
1 1/2 tbsp vegan butter, room temperature (we used Miyoko’s) – $0.66
1/4 cup cold soy milk – $0.09

Other bits:
10 tbsp (5 oz) cold vegan butter (Miyoko’s) – $4.37
Extra flour as needed for rolling pastry
1 egg, beaten, for egg wash – $0.29
1/2 cup chocolate chips – $0.50

Marzipan:
3/4 cup ground almonds – $0.95
9 tbsp powdered sugar – $0.99
1 1/2 tbsp water – free
1/2 tsp almond extract – $0.14
1/2 tsp vanilla extract – $0.14

Directions

1. Make and do the first lamination of the dough: In a small non-metal bowl, gently mix the yeast, brown sugar, and hottest tap water. Let it sit at room temperature for 5 minutes to form a thick foam on top. In a large metal bowl, mix the flour and salt.

Add the yeast mixture, softened vegan butter, and soy milk to the flour mixture, and stir it together into a ball of dough. Knead with your hands for 10 minutes until the dough is smooth and elastic. Flatten the dough into a disk, put it on a lightly floured plate, cover with cling wrap and rest in the fridge overnight.

The next morning, slice the cold butter up into thin chunks, lay them out in a square between two pieces of parchment paper, and use a rolling pin to flatten it out into an even square of butter. Remove the dough from the fridge and roll it out on a floured board – it will be nice and smooth.

Put the butter square on top of the larger dough circle, and fold two opposite sides of the dough in towards the middle, then fold the other two edges in towards the middle, pinching along the way to make a nice seal and keep the butter tucked away well inside the dough.

2. Laminate away! Use a floured counter and flip the dough regularly. Gently and evenly roll out the folded up butter-in-dough into about an 8×12″ rectangle, or as big as you can get it without the butter squeezing out through the dough. Fold it over in thirds, cover, and store in the fridge for 20 minutes.

Repeat this rolling, folding, covering, and fridge-ing 2 more times, then on the last one leave it in the fridge overnight again.

3. The next morning (2 days after starting this recipe!), roll the dough out as thinly as you can on a clean and floured counter. Make long cuts at angles to create a thin triangle pattern (see photos below). Roll each croissant up from the long end to the pointy end, and tuck the pointy end underneath the croissant so it doesn’t pop up when it bakes.

Before you roll them up, you can add chocolate chips or homemade marzipan (made by mixing all the marzipan ingredients listed above together into a paste). Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and let rise in a slightly warm place for 1 1/2 hours.

Brush the croissants with the beaten egg. Bake at 400F for 10 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for another 8 minutes. Remove from the oven and let them cool on the tray for 5 minutes before removing to a wire rack or enjoying them hot from the oven.

They freeze well in a sealed container if you’re not going to eat them the same day. Enjoy the flaky, layered pastry goodness anytime you want a treat. Bon appetit!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Summer Ratatouille: #190 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

We’ve watched the Pixar movie Ratatouille at least a dozen times, but have never worked up the courage to actually make the film’s signature dish. Finally, after 190 of these food experiments, Megan and I decided to give it a go. The hardest part is all the slicing of the vegetables. Other than that, it’s easy and fun to put together this healthy French delicacy.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($10.50 total)

Sauce:
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 green pepper, chopped – $0.69
1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes, blended – $1.59
8 fresh basil leaves, chopped – $1.10
Salt and pepper to taste

Veggies:
2 large zucchinis, sliced – $1.16
3 tomatoes, sliced – $2.97
6 small potatoes, sliced – $0.90

Herbed oil:
4 tbsp olive oil – $0.40
1 tsp thyme – $0.28
1/2 tsp oregano – $0.14
1/2 tsp basil – $0.14
1 tsp garlic powder or fresh chopped garlic – $0.28
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Make the sauce to go under the layered vegetables: In a large pan that will be safe going into the oven (no plastic handles), heat the 2 tbsp olive oil over medium high heat. Cool and stir occasionally until soft and a bit golden, about 5 minutes.

Add in the garlic and green pepper, and cook for a few minutes more. Then add in the blended tomatoes and basil, and stir to combine. Let it simmer gently for a few minutes, then remove from heat to cool a bit while you’re chopping up the vegetables.

2. Prepare the veggies: thinly slice the zucchini, potatoes, and tomatoes, and put them in a large bowl. Make the herbed oil by mixing together the 4 tbsp olive oil with the thyme, oregano, basil, garlic, salt and pepper in a small dish.

3. Assemble and bake: arrange the vegetables in mini staggered stacks of 3: one slice zucchini, one slice potato, one slice tomato, and repeat. Start around the edge of the pan to make a circle, then make another inner circle inside the outer circle, and so on until all the tomato sauce is covered up tightly by stacked vegetables. We added an extra slice of zucchini to each stack since we had leftovers.

Once you’re happy with the layout, spoon the herbed oil evenly over the top of all the vegetables. Cover the pan with foil and bake at 375F for 40 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 20 more minutes. The veggies should all be nice and soft. Cool for a few minutes and serve warm in bowls with fresh crusty bread. Bon appetit!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Apple Date Crumble Tatin: #187 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Megan and I came up with this fusion idea: apple crumble + date squares + tarte tatin. You caramelize the fruit in a pan just like the French delicacy tarte tatin, but then instead of covering it in puff pastry, you put oatmeal crumble on top and bake the whole thing.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($8.50 for a large panful)

6 apples, cored and quartered – we mixed gala and fuji – $1.79
1/3 cup margarine – $0.93
1/2 cup brown sugar – $0.26
10 dates, pitted and halved – $2.49

Crumble:
3/4 cup margarine – $1.86
1 cup brown sugar – $0.52
1 1/2 cups flour – $0.24
1 3/4 cups rolled oats – $0.21
1 tsp baking soda – $0.01
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03

Directions

1. Cut up your apples, then spread the margarine evenly and thickly over the bottom of the pan. Arrange the apples in a tight circular pattern, skin side up, then sprinkle with the brown sugar and arrange the dates on top.

2. Mix together all the crumble ingredients, first with a spoon and then using your hands to bring it all together. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over the apples and press down gently to form a nice thick crust.

3. Bake at 375F for 30 minutes, until the top is nice and toasty but not too dark brown. Remove from the oven and let it cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then carefully loosen around the edges and see if it will slide around the pan. If it can, place a large plate on top of the pan and gently but quickly flip it over to reveal the beautiful caramelized apple pattern. Cut into slices and serve warm with yogurt or ice cream.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 – 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Pasta with Pea Puree: #179 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Peas, mint, lemon, garlic, tahini, cumin, salt and pepper. It’s not your typical pasta sauce. If you like pesto, it has the same green creaminess, but without the strong pine nut flavor. This recipe was inspired by the Tres Green cookbook.

It’s part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($8 total)

2 cups peas – $1.00
5-6 leaves mint, chopped up – $0.84
2 cloves garlic – $0.08
1/4 cup tahini – $1.15
1 lemon, squeezed for juice – $0.10
1/2 tsp cumin – $0.14
Salt and pepper to taste

1 lb package rigatoni or other pasta – $2.99
1/2 cup pinto beans or ham, chopped up into cubes (optional) – $1.49
Nutritional yeast or romano cheese to sprinkle on top (optional)

Directions

1. Put the peas, mint, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, cumin, salt and pepper in a blender. Process until smooth.

2. Remove the pea puree from the blender into a bowl. Cook pasta according to package directions, then stir in the pea puree and beans or ham bits, if using.

3. Serve hot, covered with nutritional yeast or cheese, as desired.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  1 = wouldn’t make it again (not a huge pesto fan myself)
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Fast French Dressing: #165 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

My daughter Megan is turning into the family saucier – the sauce chef. Here is a dressing she made that was inspired by Rozanne. All ages enjoyed it on our lunchtime salads. Thanks Megan!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($2 total to make enough for several salads)

2 tbsp apple cider vinegar – $0.54
2 tbsp honey – $0.28
1/4 cup ketchup – $0.25
1 tsp mustard – $0.08
1/3 cup olive oil – $0.60
1 tsp garlic powder – $0.28
2 tbsp water – free
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. In a medium bowl, whisk all the ingredients together. Taste and adjust for salt/pepper as needed. Serve over your favorite salad or veggies. Store extra dressing in the fridge. And that’s it! 🙂

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Chocolate Fondue: #159 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

When holidays like New Year’s Eve or Easter roll around, we brew up a homemade chocolate fondue to dip all kinds of yummy things in. This year we cut up bananas, apples, kiwis, marshmallows, almonds, and bits of leftover cake for the fondue. It only takes a few minutes to melt the chocolate, and everyone gets to customize their dessert experience.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7 total)

3 cups chocolate chips – $3.00
1 cup almonds – $2.00
1 cup marshmallows – $0.99
1 banana – $0.19
1 apple – $0.29
1 kiwi – $0.49

Directions

1. Prepare the chocolate fondue. Put a pot of water on medium high heat and place a metal bowl on top of the pot. It’s ok if the water touches the bottom of the bowl. Pour the chocolate chips into the bowl and stir frequently as the water comes to a boil and the chocolate chips melt. When it’s all smooth and melted, turn the heat off and let it sit while you prepare the dipping things.

2. Prepare the dipping things: cut up all the fruit and put it on a plate with the almonds and marshmallows. Put out some toothpicks or skewers to poke the fruit and dip it in the fondue. Serve and enjoy!

3. We had some extra almonds and marshmallows, so we dumped them into the remaining fondue and mixed it all up. You can spread this mixture out onto parchment paper and let it cool to make your own rocky road chocolate bark. Yummy for all ages!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

French Breakfast Crepes: #158 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Crepes can seem like a daunting thing to make, but my husband makes it look very easy. We like to have these with blueberry sauce, maple syrup, and sometimes other treats like Nutella, strawberries, bananas, and whipped cream. You could also make these savory and filled with a tofu veggie stirfry. Bon appetit!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($3 total for about 12 crepes)

2 cups flour – $0.32
4 eggs – $1.16
1 cup soymilk – $0.38
1 cup water – free
1/2 tsp salt – $0.02
4 tbsp melted margarine – $0.62
Canola oil spray – $0.15

Directions

1. In a large bowl, add the flour and eggs together, and whisk to combine. Slowly add in the soymilk and water, stirring constantly so it doesn’t get lumpy. Last, add in the salt and melted margarine and mix until it’s a beautifully smooth and pretty thin batter.

Heat a small or medium pan over medium heat and drop a ladleful of batter in the pan, immediately lifting the pan and rolling it around to make an even circular layer that fills all the edges.

2. After 2 minutes of cooking, loosen the edges of the crepe with a spatula or a fork, and either do a fancy pan flip or grab a spatula to flip it like a pancake. Cook for 2 more minutes until both sides are a gentle golden color, then slide the crepe out of the pan onto a plate. Keep the stack of crepes warm in the oven while you’re cooking the rest.

3. Serve hot and fresh, with blueberry sauce, maple syrup, Nutella, strawberries, bananas, or whatever other toppings you enjoy! These work well as leftovers the next day too – just pop them in the microwave for a few seconds to re-warm.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Luscious Chicken Bourbon Beet Stew: #135 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

It starts out with the luscious savory flavors of coq au vin, but with bourbon instead of wine. Then you layer in red and gold beets and the beet greens. And voila, a dinner fit for a royal family. Or any family! Like any good stew, it takes a bit of time, but it’s well worth the effort.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($19 for a big pot)

1 bunch each of red and gold beets, with the greens – $3.68
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
3 large chicken breasts – $6.54
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 bunch brown beech mushrooms – $2.69
3/4 cup bourbon (or wine if you prefer) – $3.60
3 cups homemade chicken stock – $1.00
1 tsp each thyme and oregano – $0.56
2 tbsp flour – $0.02
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Prepare the ingredients: separate the beets from the greens and boil the beet roots for 1 hour in a large pot of water, until tender. Run them under cool water, rub off the peels with your fingers, and chop the beets into bite-sized pieces.

In another large pot, heat the olive oil over medium high heat, then lightly brown the chicken until the outside is cooked. Remove the chicken and add the onion and garlic. Stir and cook for 5-10 minutes until translucent.

2. Assemble the stew: when the onions are done, add the mushrooms, bourbon, spices, salt and pepper, and mix well. Cut up the chicken breast into large pieces and add to the pot, then add the chicken stock, which should cover all the ingredients. 

Add in the chopped beets, bring to a boil, then lower to medium low for a gentle simmer. Cover the pot and simmer for 40 minutes.

3. Finish the stew: when the simmering step is done, it should look nice and red. Add in the flour and the washed, chopped up beet greens, then cook for a couple more minutes to wilt the greens. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust seasonings as needed. Serve hot, with at least one big piece of chicken per bowl, surrounded by yummy veggies.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!