Dutch Crunch Rolls: Recipe #202

Dutch crunch rolls are popular for sandwiches here in the San Francisco Bay Area. In Europe, it’s called Tiger Bread because of the striped pattern on top. It’s a soft bread on the inside with a crispy rice flour topping that bakes into a crunchy crust. Many thanks to Aparna for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($4.50 total for 6 large buns)

Dough :
1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tbsp brown sugar – $0.03
1/4 cup hottest tap water – free
3 tsp coconut oil – $1.65
1 cup soy milk – $0.37
1/2 cup whole wheat flour – $0.09
2 1/2 cups white flour – $0.40
1 1/2 tsp salt – $0.03

Crunch topping:
3/4 cup rice flour – $0.24
1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tbsp brown sugar – $0.03
1/2 cup hottest tap water – free
1 tbsp coconut oil – $0.55
1/2 tsp salt – $0.01

Directions for Dutch Crunch Rolls

1. Make the bread dough: in a small non-metal bowl, gently mix the yeast, brown sugar, and water. Let it sit for 5 minutes to form a thick foam on top – this is how you know the yeast is active and ready to go.

In a large metal bowl, mix the whole wheat flour, 2 cups white flour, and salt. When the yeast is ready, add it to the flour mixture along with the coconut oil and soy milk. Stir until it comes together into a ball of dough, then knead with your hands for 10 minutes, adding in up to 1/2 cup more flour if it’s really sticking to your fingers. The dough should be nice and smooth and elastic.

Cover with cling wrap and let it rise in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours to double in size.

2. Punch the risen dough down to remove the air, then cut it into 6 equal pieces. Shape them into balls and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover and rise in a warm place for 20 minutes.

While this is rising, in a separate bowl, mix all the crunch topping ingredients together and stir to combine. Let this sit to puff up a bit while the buns are rising.

3. Brush a thick layer of crunch topping over the top and sides of each bun. Let it rise, uncovered, for another 20 minutes, then bake at 375 for 25 minutes. The top of the buns will be a deep golden brown and there should be cracks on the surface.

Cool on a wire rack and enjoy these Dutch crunch rolls with your favorite sandwich fillings, like balsamic maple glazed tempeh.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = 3+ hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 13/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Dutch Stamppot (Cabbage, Potatoes, Plant-Based Sausage): #138 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

I learned about stamppot from an old Canadian cookbook, but it’s originally a Dutch recipe. You cook a vegetable like kale or savoy cabbage with a bunch of potatoes in a big pot, then add some (plant-based) sausage. Mash it all up with a bit of olive oil and salt, and you have a delicious and comforting dinner.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($11 total for a large pot)

1 large savoy cabbage, chopped – $2.49
6 yukon gold potatoes, diced – $1.08
2 cups water – free
1 tbsp salt – 0.13
1 package Field Roast smoked apple sage sausage or other plant-based sausage – $6.99
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.50
Vinegar or Worcestershire sauce to taste

Directions

1. In a large pot, add the cabbage, potatoes, water, and salt. Cover and bring to a boil over medium high heat, then reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.

2. Break up the plant-based sausage and crumble it into the pot. Cook for a few extra minutes.

3. When everything is nicely wilted and soft, add the olive oil and seasonings to taste. You can mash it all up if you like, or leave it chunky as we did. Enjoy hot from the pot for a warm winter meal. Leftovers freeze well too.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18 – maximum score!

Experiment Outcome: This recipe gets added to our Family Favorites! 🙂

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!