Apricot Plum Cobbler (Plant-Based): Recipe #222

Would you believe I’ve made it through 43 years on this planet without ever making a cobbler? And I don’t remember ever eating one either. What is a cobbler, you say? It’s baked fruit with fresh biscuit dough on top, which sounds spectacular! We had some soft summer fruit to use up, so we adapted a peach raspberry recipe from the fantastic book Isa Does It to make our apricot plum cobbler. Yum!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($10 for one 8×8″ pan = 9 servings)

Fruit filling:
2 cups apricots, quartered – $3.00
2 cups plums, quartered – $3.00
1 nectarine, sliced – $0.99
1 lemon, juiced – $0.20
1/2 cup brown sugar – $0.26
2 tbsp cornstarch – $0.20
2 tbsp flour – $0.02
1/4 tsp salt – $0.01

Biscuit dough:
6 tbsp soy milk – $0.14
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – $0.27
1-1/2 cups white whole wheat flour – $0.26
1-1/2 tsp baking powder – $0.05
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
3 tbsp brown sugar – $0.09
2 tbsp coconut oil – $1.10
2 tbsp margarine – $0.31
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20

Directions for Apricot Plum Cobbler

1. Bake the fruit: Mix all the fruit filling ingredients together and spread out in a greased 8×8″ pan. Cover with foil and bake at 425F for 20 minutes.

While that’s baking, make the biscuit dough: In a small bowl, mix the soy milk and vinegar. Let it sit for a minute or two to curdle. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, salt, and brown sugar together. Add the coconut oil and margarine into the dry ingredients and rub it together with your fingers until it turns into crumbs. Mix the vanilla into the curdled soy milk, then add all the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix into a ball of dough. Separate the dough into 9 even balls.

2. Take the baked fruit out of the oven, remove the foil, and drop the biscuit dough balls on top of the fruit. Bake again, uncovered this time, for another 20 minutes. The biscuits will get golden brown when it’s done, and the fruit mixture will bubble up. Remove the cobbler from the oven.

Use a large spoon to scoop out a whole biscuit and all the fruit underneath it into a bowl. Serve your apricot plum cobbler warm as is or with non-dairy yogurt/ice cream. Enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Vegan Potstickers/Gyoza/Mandu Dumplings: Recipe #214

Many cultures have a filled dumpling kind of food: samosas, empanadas, pierogies, ravioli, mochi, blueberry buns… Maybe we’re on a quest to try them all! In Japan and Korea these marvels are savory and can be filled with veggies like cabbage and mushrooms. They’re fun to cook, steamed on one side and fried on the other side, then dipped in a sesame soy based sauce. All the kids went back for seconds of these vegan potstickers. Hope you enjoy! Thanks to Bianca for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($11 for about 12 gyoza)

Gyoza dough:
2 1/2 cups flour – $0.40
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
2/3 cup hot water – free
Cornstarch to dust

Filling:
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil – $0.40
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped – $0.15
1 tsp ginger – $0.28
1 leek, chopped – $1.49
1 package enoki mushrooms – $2.49
1 head savoy cabbage, chopped – $2.49
1 orange pepper, chopped – $1.69
2 tbsp soy sauce – $0.20
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – $0.27
Salt and pepper to taste

1 tbsp canola oil for cooking – $0.04
1/4 cup water – free

Sauce:
3 tbsp soy sauce – $0.30
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar – $0.27
1 tbsp maple syrup – $0.24
1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil – $0.04

Garnish (optional): tofu, sesame seeds, green onion

Directions for Vegan Potstickers

1. Make the dough: In a medium bowl, mix the flour and salt, then pour in the hot water while stirring until it comes together into a ball of dough. Knead with your hands for 5 minutes, then wrap it in cling wrap and refrigerate for 1/2 hour to 1 hour.

After that, roll it out on a board dusted with cornstarch to a round shape as thin as you can make it. Use a round cookie cutter about 3″ wide to cut out circles that will be used to wrap the dumplings.

2. Make the filling: In a large pan, heat the 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil over medium high heat, then add in the garlic. Cook for 2-3 minutes until the garlic starts to turn golden, then add in the ginger and leeks and cook for 3-5 more minutes to soften the leeks.

Add in the mushrooms, cabbage, and pepper, followed by the 2 tbsp soy sauce and 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar. Cook for 5-7 more minutes until the cabbage is wilted and the liquid is mostly gone. Set aside to cool for the filling stage.

3. Assemble and cook the gyoza: Use your fingers to stretch a wrapper out a little bit more, then add a full teaspoon of filling to the center of the wrapper. Fold the wrapper over the filling like a taco shell, working from one end and pinching the two sides along the edge in a diagonal overlapping pattern (see pictures below), or any pattern you like.

Heat up the canola oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the dumplings and cook for about 3 minutes until they get nice and golden on the bottom, then pour in the 1/4 cup water and cover the pot with a lid. Steam for about 8 minutes until the water has evaporated, then remove the potstickers carefully from the pot with a flapjack (they will be a lovely shade of brown after being nicely stuck to the pan).

Stir the sauce ingredients together, and serve with the gyoza/vegan potstickers, the leftover filling, tofu, and any garnishes you like. Enjoy hot from the pan!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Savory Bean Stew with Dumplings: Recipe #188

We’ve made this bean stew recipe twice already, with the lovely combination of dill, rosemary, and sage warming our tummies. As a bonus, leftovers the next day are just as good as the real thing. Many thanks to the Post-Punk Kitchen for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7 for a large pot)

Stew:
2 tablespoons olive oil – $0.20
1/4 cup all purpose flour – $0.04
1 medium onion, chopped – $0.50
1 tsp salt – $0.05
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
6 cups vegetable broth – free from boiling leftover kale and collard stalks
2 celery stalks, chopped – $0.15
1 1/2 pounds gold potatoes, cut into chunks – $1.35
2 carrots, chopped – $0.46
1 large zucchini, chopped – $0.78
1 tsp sage – $0.28
1 tbsp dill – $0.70
1/2 tsp paprika – $0.14
Salt and pepper to taste
2 cups freshly cooked or canned pinto beans, rinsed – $0.79

Dumplings:
1 1/2 cups flour – $0.24
2 tsp baking powder – $0.03
1 tbsp rosemary – $0.70
1 tsp salt – $0.05
3/4 cup unsweetened soy milk – $0.28
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20

Directions for Savory Bean Stew

1. Start the stew: in a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add in the flour and cook, stirring continuously, for a few minutes until it gets nice and thick. Then stir in the onions and salt, and mix well to coat the onions in the sauce. Next add the garlic, celery, and start pouring in the vegetable broth. Whisk well as you go to evenly mix in the broth with the flour mixture.

2. Once all the broth is mixed in, add the potatoes, carrots, zucchini, beans, sage, dill, and paprika, as well as salt and pepper to your liking. Raise the heat to bring it to a boil, then reduce it to keep it simmering on medium-low heat for about 20 minutes until the potatoes are tender. No need to cover the pot at this point – the evaporating steam means the stew will be nice and thick.

Prepare the dumplings: mix all the dumpling ingredients together in a medium bowl and mix well. When the stew is nice and thick and the vegetables are tender, drop spoonfuls of the dumpling mix right on top of the stew, evenly spacing them out over the surface. We got 12 large dumplings out of it. Cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid and cook for 14 minutes, making sure the stew is simmering gently.

3. The dumplings will get nice and firm to the touch when they’re done. Serve hot in a bowl with a dumpling and a scoop or two of bean stew poured over top of it. So yummy and comforting! Leftovers keep well in the fridge or freezer, and can be microwaved when you’re ready to eat them.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum score!)

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Vegan Malai Kofta: Recipe #184

Malai kofta is a classic Indian comfort food – think of tender dumplings in a creamy sauce. This recipe is a plant-based delight that blends cashews, coconut milk, and spices to create a rich sauce without all that dairy in it. The dumplings have garbanzo beans, almonds, and zucchini in them, and we added some peas and rice noodles to round out a complete and satisfying meal. Thanks to Isa who inspired this vegan malai kofta.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($15 total for 6 servings)

Kofta:
1 can chick peas – $0.99
1/2 cup ground almonds – $0.63
1 large zucchini, grated – $0.58
1 tsp cumin – $0.28
1 tbsp ginger – $0.70
1 tsp garlic powder – $0.28
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
Pepper to taste
1 cup ground up Hawaiian sweet rolls or other breadcrumbs – free

Sauce:
1 cup cashews, soaked for 2 hours – $2.00
2 cups vegetable broth – $1.00
1/2 large onion, chopped – $0.25
4 cloves garlic – $0.15
1 tbsp ginger – $0.70
1 tbsp curry powder – $0.70
1 tsp cumin – $0.28
1 can coconut milk – $1.99
1/4 cup crushed tomatoes – $0.20
1 tsp salt – $0.05
1 lemon, juiced – $0.20

1 tbsp coconut oil to cook kofta – $0.55
1-2 cups frozen peas – $1.00
1 package fresh pad Thai noodles – $2.99

Directions for Vegan Malai Kofta

1. Make the kofta: mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl, stir well to combine, and refrigerate the mixture for half an hour to firm it up. Shape them in your palm into about 18 oval shaped balls. Return to the fridge until you’re ready to cook them.

2. In a blender, add all the sauce ingredients and blend together until relatively smooth, then pour it into a large pan.

3. In a large pan, heat the coconut oil over medium high heat. Cook the kofta for several minutes, turning them around gently with a form to brown as many sides as possible.

Add the peas and fresh pad thai noodles to the sauce and warm to a boil. Follow package directions for how long the noodles need to cook.

Serve your vegan malai kofta in bowls over top the noodles and curry sauce. Enjoy it hot from the stove. You’ll be left with a very warm and happy tummy.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum score!)

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Sensational Baked Samosas: Recipe #153

Here we take the warm healing of a potato curry and add a crisp baked pastry instead of the traditional fried version. Your heart and your mouth will both be happy. The kiddos gobble these baked samosas down too!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($6 total for 12 samosas)

Pastry (thanks to Alissa for the inspiration!):
2 cups flour – $0.32
2 tsp baking powder – $0.03
1 tsp salt – $0.05
1/2 cup + 1 tbsp water – free
1/4 cup coconut oil – $2.20

Filling:
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
1/2 onion, chopped – $0.50
2 garlic cloves, minced – $0.08
1/2 tsp each ginger, turmeric, curry powder, cumin, salt, pepper – $0.84
2 potatoes, baked in the microwave and chopped – $0.40
1/2 cup chopped asparagus or peas – $0.25

Dipping sauce (kid invention called MegaSauce!):
1 1/2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce – $0.15
3 tbsp soy sauce – $0.30
2 tbsp maple syrup – $0.48

Non-stick cooking spray (canola or coconut oil) to lightly coat the pastries – $0.50

Directions for Sensational Baked Samosas

1. Prepare the dough, filling, and sauce. In a medium bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, and salt together. Add the water and coconut oil and mix well until it forms a dough. Knead for about 5 minutes, then put in a lightly oiled bowl and cover to let the dough rest for about 30 minutes while you prepare the veggies.

In a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the onions and cook for 5 minutes until they get soft. Then add the garlic and spices, mix well, and cook for 3-4 more minutes. Microwave the potatoes for 5 minutes or until a fork can pass through them easily, then chop up the potato and add to the onion mix with the asparagus or peas. Stir to mix well then set aside.

In a small bowl, mix all the dipping sauce ingredients and mix well.

2. After the dough has rested, cut it into 6 pieces and gently roll them into balls. On a floured surface, roll out each ball to a fairly thin circle about 5 or 6 inches across. Slice the circle in half with a knife, and add about 1 tbsp filling to each half. Fold the two cut corners of the pastry down together over the filling to make a triangle shape, then pinch the ends of the triangle together and fold it over to seal in the filling with a nice scalloped edge. You can also pinch together the seam across the top.

3. Once the pastry is nicely shaped and sealed, spray the top and bottom of each one with cooking spray and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Once you’ve filled all the pastries, bake them at 400F for 25 minutes, until they’re nice and golden on top.

Serve your baked samosas with the dipping sauce and your favorite side dish (we had some extra jerk chicken lying around). These also make great leftovers the next day. Enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Plant-Based Pierogies: #134 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Pierogies are dumplings from Eastern Europe traditionally filled with things like potato, meat, cheese, fruit, or vegetables, and then boiled. We chose a savory potato-bean-onion filling that is both plant-based and tasty, and we made our own dough. It was a fun weekend project!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($6.50 total for a dozen pierogies)

3 cups flour – $0.48
1 tsp salt – $0.05
2 tbsp coconut oil – $1.10
2/3 cup water – free
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
1/2 onion, chopped – $0.25
1/2 tsp each oregano, garlic powder, and basil – $0.42
1 can black beans – $0.79
3 potatoes, baked and peeled – $0.90
Salt and pepper to taste (optional sprinkle of Worcestershire sauce if you like that flavor)
1/2 cup tahini to drizzle over top – $2.30

Directions

1. Make the dough: mix the flour and salt together, then rub in the coconut oil until it’s a fine crumb mixture. Add the water and stir it into a dough. Knead for 3 minutes, adding a bit more flour if it’s too sticky. 

Cover with a tea towel and let the dough rest for 15 minutes, then roll it out to 1/4″ thickness on a lightly floured board.

2. While the dough is resting, make the filling. In a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat, then add the onion. Cook for 5-10 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onion is translucent and starting to brown. Add the spices and black beans, and stir well.

Mash up the baked potatoes (you can bake them in the microwave if you don’t want to fire up the oven) and mix them into the beans and onions. Taste and adjust seasonings, add salt and pepper to taste.

3. Make the pierogies: using a large glass, cut out circles from the the rolled out dough and put about 1 tbsp of filling into each one. Fold the dough circle in half around the filling and pinch all the edges together, then fold the pinched edge over all around to make a nice decorative seal. 

Boil the pierogies in a large pot of salted water until they float to the top, about 10 minutes. Stir occasionally and gently to make sure they’re not sticking to the bottom of the pot. Serve drizzled with tahini and accompanied with veggies – we had it with leftover chakalaka.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 1 = inedible (dough was very chewy, need to roll it thinner next time)
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal impact
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 13/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Garlic, Tomato, and Sage: #112 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

My Italian grandparents used to be famous for their gnocchi, and one summer they showed me how to make them. This is their gnocchi recipe as I remember it, except I like to use butternut squash sometimes instead of potato. If you’re looking for healthy comfort food, look no further!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5.50 total)

FOR THE GNOCCHI DOUGH:
1/2 butternut squash – $1.29
1 egg – $0.29
1 tsp salt – $0.05
3 1/2 cups flour – $0.56

FOR THE SAUCE:
4 tbsp olive oil – $0.40
4 cloves garlic – $0.15
1 tbsp sage – $0.28
1 cup crushed tomatoes – $0.50
4-5 slices turkey (optional), chopped up) – $0.75
2 cups frozen peas – $1.00
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Make the gnocchi: Poke the butternut squash with a fork all around and roast at 350F for about 1 1/2 hours until you can stick a fork through the neck pretty easily. 

Cool, cut in half, then scoop out and discard the seeds. Next, scoop out the flesh into a medium bowl and discard the skin. You’ll only need half of the squash so you can eat the rest separately.

Add the egg and salt and mix them in, then add the flour, mixing it in 1/2 cup at a time. It will come together into a nice dense dough ball. Knead it a few times to make sure it’s soft and uniformly mixed (no chunks of flour or squash).

Break off a chunk of dough and roll it into a thick rope on a floured board. Cut 1″ slices off the rope and slide them over the back of a fork or spoon to make any little patterns you like. 

Put the gnocchi on a parchment-lined baking sheet – you can cook from here or freeze for later use.

2. Make the sauce: Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium-high heat, then add the garlic and sage (oregano works nicely here too). Cook for 2-3 minutes until golden but not too brown, then add the turkey chunks (if using) and crushed tomatoes. 

Turn the heat down to let the sauce bubble and simmer while the gnocchi cook, then add the peas near the end of the gnocchi cooking time so they defrost in the sauce.

3. Cook and serve: Drop the gnocchi into a large pot of salted, boiling water. They will pop up to the top after a few minutes. After about 10 minutes of boiling, take a large one out and taste it or cut it in half to see if it’s still doughy in the middle. If they’re frozen, they will take longer to cook (up to 25 minutes or so, depending on how big they are). 

Once they’re cooked through, drain the water, toss the gnocchi with the sauce, and serve up yummy plates. Top with pecorino romano cheese and freshly ground pepper if you like.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Blueberry Dumplings with Maple Cream: #109 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

This is a fun dessert or breakfast to make – it’s basically like a giant blueberry-upside down muffin that you make in a pan on the stove. Blueberry sauce + dumplings + whipped (coconut) maple cream = happy smiling tummies.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($11 total for a big panful)

4 cups frozen blueberries – $4.98
½ cup brown sugar (optional) – $0.26
1 tbsp lemon juice – $0.10
1 ¾ cup flour – $0.28
3 tbsp sugar – $0.17
2 tsp baking powder – $0.03
½ tsp salt – $0.03
¼ cup butter or margarine – $0.62
1 cup milk or soy milk – $0.37
2 cups dairy or coconut whipping cream – $2.99
3 Tbsp maple syrup – $0.71

Directions

1. Make blueberry sauce: In a large pan, mix blueberries, brown sugar, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil. Then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until berries soften, about 3 minutes.

Make dumplings: In a large bowl, mix the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Rub the butter or margarine in with your fingers until the mixture looks like fine crumbs. Add milk and stir just until combined.

2. Drop tablespoonfuls of dumpling batter on top of the blueberry mixture in the pan. Cover with a lid that’s buttered on the inside, so the dumplings won’t stick to it. Keep the heat low enough to just bubble but not boil disruptively. Simmer until dumplings have steamed and are dry/firm to touch, about 15 mins.

3. While dumplings are steaming, make the maple cream. Combine the whipping cream (we used the coconut-based one shown below) and maple syrup in a large bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat until the cream is nice and stiff.

Scoop the blueberry dumplings into bowls and serve topped with maple cream.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Asparagus Soup with Turkey Dumplings: #18 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

If you go to Denmark and are searching for comfort food, you might just come across this creamy, warming soup. Bright green asparagus paired with tender veal or turkey meatballs, gently simmering away, ready to clear whatever cobwebs you’re stuck in with each delicious mouthful.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($10.50 total)

1 tbsp butter – $0.16
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 bunch asparagus, chopped – $3.29
3 cups water – free
1/2 tsp + 1/2 tsp sage – $0.28
1/2 tsp oregano – $0.14
Salt and pepper to taste
1 lb ground turkey – $3.99
1 egg – $0.31
1 cup breadcrumbs – $0.25 (I took 2 leftover biscuits from the freezer and ground them up in the blender)
1 tbsp fresh chives, chopped – $0.45
1 tsp garlic powder – $0.28
1/4 cup Pecorino Romano cheese, grated – $1.00

Directions

1. In a large pan, melt the butter and cook the onions over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes until soft and translucent, then add garlic and cook for 2 more minutes. Stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick and burn.

When onions are just starting to brown, add the chopped asparagus stems, saving the tips aside for later. Also add in 1/2 tsp of sage, the oregano, salt, pepper, and water. Bring to a boil, then cover and turn heat down to medium-low to simmer for 30 minutes. This will make the asparagus very tender and ready to blend.

2. While that is cooking, prepare the turkey meatballs (can also use veal). Mix the turkey, egg, breadcrumbs, 1/2 tsp sage, cheese, chives, and garlic powder together in a medium bowl. Mash it all up with freshly washed hands, then form 10 medium sized meatballs and set aside.

When the asparagus is nice and soft, pour the soup into the blender and puree until smooth. Return the soup to the pan or pot and drop in the meatballs. Cover the pan and simmer for 10 minutes or until meatballs are cooked through. 

3. Stir in the asparagus tips and let them soften for 2-3 minutes. Serve with an optional squeeze of lemon or sprinkling of more cheese.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!