Bangladesh Khichuri: Recipe #247

Bangladesh Khichuri is a rice and lentil risotto filled with healing vegetables and lovely spices. It’s a beautiful, warm bowl of comfort on a cold day, or anytime your spirit needs a hug. Thanks to Rinku for inspiration!

Today’s meditation is from Plum Village. When you are taking the first four bites of your meal, take a moment to contemplate these mindful aspirations:

With the first taste, I offer joy.
And with the second, I help relieve the suffering of others.
With the third, I see others’ joy as my own.
And with the fourth, I learn the way of letting go.

May you experience ease and happiness in your meals and in your day.

I hope you enjoy this recipe, which is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and yours.

Ingredients ($8 for a large pot)

2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
1/2 onion, chopped – $0.25
3/4 cup lentils – $0.51
1/2 cup rice – $0.18
1 tsp each cumin, coriander, and ginger – $0.84
1 tsp salt or to taste – $0.05
1/2 tsp turmeric – $0.14
2 cups zucchini and collards, chopped – $2.33
1 medium sized potato, cubed – $0.15
1/4 cup peas – $0.25
4 cups vegetable broth – $2.00
1 tbsp coconut oil – $0.55
1 lemon, juiced – $0.20

Directions for Bangladesh Khichuri

1. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onion starts to soften and get a little bit browned. Then add the lentils and rice, and stir to combine. Next, add in the cumin, coriander, ginger, salt, and turmeric, and mix well to coat everything in the spices.

Add in the chopped zucchini, potato, and vegetable broth. Cover the pot and cook at a gentle bubble over medium heat for 30 minutes or until the zucchini and potatoes are tender and the rice is cooked.

2. Finally, add the collards, coconut oil, lemon juice, and peas. Mix well and taste for seasonings, adding more salt or some pepper if needed. Enjoy your healing bowl of Bangladesh khichuri hot from the pot, and save any leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum score!)

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Coconut Tofu Curry: Recipe #234

I’m finally getting more comfortable with curries, where I can just cook and invent and adjust without following a recipe. I can do this for Italian and British cooking, since that’s what I grew up with, but expanding my repertoire is wonderful too. For this take on Thai curry we played with broccoli, mushrooms, kale, tofu, and coconut milk to make some culinary magic.

Hope you enjoy, and thanks for being part of our delicious planet-saving family!

Ingredients ($14 total)

1 tbsp coconut oil – $0.55
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
4 garlic, minced – $0.15
1 tbsp curry powder – $0.70
1 tsp each cumin and ginger – $0.56
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tbsp flour – $0.02
2 cups miso ginger broth or vegetable broth – $1.00
1 head broccoli, chopped – $3.49
5-6 mushrooms, chopped – $1.25
1/4 bag chopped kale, destemmed and chopped – $0.49
2 x 5 oz cans coconut milk – $0.67
1/4 cup crushed tomatoes – $0.40
1 lime, juiced – $0.20
1 package teriyaki baked tofu, chopped up – $3.69
3 cups cooked rice – $0.35

Directions

1. Chop and prepare all your ingredients, and start the rice cooking. I had some lovely help for this part!

Then, in a large pan, heat the coconut oil over medium high heat. Add the onion, garlic, curry powder, cumin, ginger, salt and pepper. Stirfry for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onions are soft and the spices smell incredible.

2. Next, stir in the flour into the onions and cook for 2 minutes to thicken, then gradually stir in the broth. Add in the broccoli, mushrooms, and kale, followed by the coconut milk, crushed tomatoes, lime juice, and tofu. Simmer over medium heat for 5-10 minutes until broccoli is tender but still bright green.

Serve the coconut tofu curry hot over rice, and enjoy your bowl of curried comfort. ❤️

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Vegan Malai Kofta: Recipe #184

Malai kofta is a classic Indian comfort food – think of tender dumplings in a creamy sauce. This recipe is a plant-based delight that blends cashews, coconut milk, and spices to create a rich sauce without all that dairy in it. The dumplings have garbanzo beans, almonds, and zucchini in them, and we added some peas and rice noodles to round out a complete and satisfying meal. Thanks to Isa who inspired this vegan malai kofta.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($15 total for 6 servings)

Kofta:
1 can chick peas – $0.99
1/2 cup ground almonds – $0.63
1 large zucchini, grated – $0.58
1 tsp cumin – $0.28
1 tbsp ginger – $0.70
1 tsp garlic powder – $0.28
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
Pepper to taste
1 cup ground up Hawaiian sweet rolls or other breadcrumbs – free

Sauce:
1 cup cashews, soaked for 2 hours – $2.00
2 cups vegetable broth – $1.00
1/2 large onion, chopped – $0.25
4 cloves garlic – $0.15
1 tbsp ginger – $0.70
1 tbsp curry powder – $0.70
1 tsp cumin – $0.28
1 can coconut milk – $1.99
1/4 cup crushed tomatoes – $0.20
1 tsp salt – $0.05
1 lemon, juiced – $0.20

1 tbsp coconut oil to cook kofta – $0.55
1-2 cups frozen peas – $1.00
1 package fresh pad Thai noodles – $2.99

Directions for Vegan Malai Kofta

1. Make the kofta: mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl, stir well to combine, and refrigerate the mixture for half an hour to firm it up. Shape them in your palm into about 18 oval shaped balls. Return to the fridge until you’re ready to cook them.

2. In a blender, add all the sauce ingredients and blend together until relatively smooth, then pour it into a large pan.

3. In a large pan, heat the coconut oil over medium high heat. Cook the kofta for several minutes, turning them around gently with a form to brown as many sides as possible.

Add the peas and fresh pad thai noodles to the sauce and warm to a boil. Follow package directions for how long the noodles need to cook.

Serve your vegan malai kofta in bowls over top the noodles and curry sauce. Enjoy it hot from the stove. You’ll be left with a very warm and happy tummy.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum score!)

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Chana Curry Buns: Recipe #182

Chana is the Hindi word for chickpea, a widely used legume in Indian cuisine. These yeasted chana curry buns have a curry-scented dough and a filling of spiced chickpeas, coconut milk, raisins, and onions. They were inspired by the Great British Bakeoff cookbook and proved to be a lovely accompaniment to our asparagus leek potato soup.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5.50 total for 4 large stuffed buns)

Dough:
1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tsp brown sugar – $0.01
1/3 cup hottest tap water + 1 cup warm water – free
4 cups white whole wheat flour – $0.64
1 tbsp curry powder – $0.70
2 tsp salt – $0.10
1 tbsp sesame seeds – $0.08
1/4 cup olive oil – $0.40

Filling:
1 tbsp canola oil – $0.05
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
3 celery stalks, chopped – $0.15
2 garlic cloves, minced – $0.08
1/2 tsp turmeric – $0.14
1/2 tsp cumin – $0.14
2 tsp curry powder – $0.56
1 tsp brown sugar – $0.01
1/4 cup raisins – $0.25
1 can chickpeas/garbanzo beans, drained – $0.79
1/4 cup coconut milk – $0.49
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions for Chana Curry Buns

1. Prepare the dough: in a small plastic bowl, mix the yeast, brown sugar, and 1/3 cup hottest tap water together briefly. Let it sit for 5 minutes to bloom the yeast until a thick foam forms on top. In a large metal bowl, mix the flour, curry powder, salt, and sesame seeds.

Once the yeast has bloomed, add the yeast mixture and the olive oil to the flour mixture. Stir well with a wooden spoon to form it into a dough. Knead the dough with your hands for 10 minutes, then put it back in the metal bowl. Cover with cling wrap and let it rise in a warm place for about 1 hour until it has doubled in size.

2. Prepare the filling: In a large pan, heat the canola oil over medium high heat. Add the onion and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes to soften the onions. Add in the garlic, turmeric, cumin, and curry powder, and mix well. Next, add the raisins and chickpeas, and finally the coconut milk.

Stir to combine and cook for about 10 minutes over low heat, until the mixture is pretty dry. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust seasonings as needed. Remove from heat and cool.

3. Assemble the chana buns: cut the risen dough into 4 equal pieces. Roll each piece out on a cutting board to a circle about 6 inches across. Divide the filling into 4 portions and put one portion into the center of each circle. Wrap the dough around the filling and pinch the ends together. Turn the bun over so the pinched ends are underneath, then place on a parchment-lined baking sheet.

Cover the chana curry buns buns with a tea towel and let them rise in a warm place for about 1 hour until doubled. Remove the cover and bake the buns at 425F for 20 minutes until they’re nice and golden brown. Cut into them and serve warm with your favorite soup or salad.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = 3+ hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Cauliflower Tikka Masala: Recipe #176

We love the creamy curry-ness of a good chicken tikka, but now we’re eating more of a plant-based diet. What to do? Fortunately Jamie Oliver came to the rescue with the inspiration for this cauliflower tikka masala recipe. Very comforting comfort food, and healthy to boot.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($12 total)

Blend:
1 can coconut milk – $1.99
1 tomato – $0.99
2 heaping tbsp cashews – $0.24
1 tbsp apricot jam – $0.16
1 lemon, squeezed – $0.20
1/4 tsp paprika – $0.07
1 tbsp curry powder – $0.70
2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped – $0.08
1 tsp ginger – $0.28

Sauté:
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
2 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 head cauliflower, chopped into bite-sized pieces – $2.49
1 bunch collard greens, chopped – $1.99
1 bunch chard, chopped – $1.99
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions for Cauliflower Tikka Masala

1. Put all the “Blend” ingredients in a blender and process until it makes a smooth simmer sauce.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium high heat, then add the onions. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions start to soften, then add the garlic and cook for 3 more minutes to start to brown the garlic. Next add the cauliflower, the greens, and the simmer sauce.

3. Bring to a bubbly boil then turn the heat down and let it simmer for about 10 minutes until the cauliflower is soft and the flavors have all melded together. Cook the rice during this time too, using one part rice and two parts water, with a bit of salt.

Serve the cauliflower tikka masala hot over rice, and enjoy the melting comforting sensation of filling your body with this healing treat of a meal.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18 (maximum score!)

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Chakalaka (Cabbage Bean Curry): #131 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Chakalaka is a South African dish that’s like a cross between a chili and a curry. Made with cabbage, beans, tomatoes, onions, and spices, it’s easy to prepare as a lovely comforting dinner. We had it on top of baked potatoes, but you could serve it over rice or pasta just as well. We’ll be making this again!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($6.50 total for a big pot)

2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
1/2 onion, minced – $0.25
1 tbsp curry powder – $0.70
1 tsp garlic powder – $0.28
1 tsp thyme – $0.28
1/2 tsp paprika – $0.14
1/2 tsp ginger – $0.14
1 can diced tomatoes – $1.59
1 cabbage, chopped – $2.49
3 cups cooked beans – $0.24
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium high heat, then add the minced onion. Cook for 5 minutes, then add in the curry powder, garlic powder, thyme, paprika, ginger, salt and pepper. Stir to combine and cook for a couple more minutes.

2. Add the chopped tomatoes and mix well, then add the cabbage and beans.

3. Turn heat down to medium and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes or until the cabbage has wilted. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Serve warm over baked potato, rice, or pasta.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers 
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal (for the younger kiddos, 3 for the older ones!)
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Curried Chicken Salad: #81 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

What to do with all that leftover chicken or turkey from a whole roast? Curried chicken salad is super easy and one of my favorite ways to stretch out leftovers. It’s just chicken, mayo, cranberries, nuts, and curry powder. And everyone gobbles it up!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($4 total)

Leftover roast chicken – free
1 cup mayonnaise – $1.00
3 tbsp curry powder – $2.10
1/2 cup cranberries – $0.50
1/2 cup roasted cashews or almonds – $1.00
Any other garnishes you like (green onions, celery, chutney)

Directions

1. Put your leftover chicken pieces into a large bowl, and add all the other ingredients.

2. Mix well until thoroughly combined, and taste for salt/pepper/curry powder. Adjust as needed.

3. Serve in a sandwich, as a snack, or with leftover vegetables from the roast dinner.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Savory Fish Curry: #67 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

What happens when you have a bunch of ingredients in the fridge and you don’t know what to cook? Search for a recipe that can accommodate all of the pieces you have! That’s how this yummy fish curry came to be. Feel free to experiment in your own kitchen too. 🙂

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7.50 total)

Leftover sole fillet – free
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
4 cloves garlic, chopped – $0.15
1 tsp each cumin, ginger, turmeric, curry powder, chili powder – $1.40
1/2 cup dried coconut – $0.33
1 15 oz can tomato sauce – $0.67
1 large zucchini, sliced – $0.78
3 medium potatoes, chopped – $0.54
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium high heat, then add the chopped onion, garlic, spices, and coconut. Cook for 5-10 minutes until onion is soft and spices smell fragrant.

2. Stir in the tomato sauce, potatoes, zucchini, salt and pepper. When it starts to bubble, turn the heat down to a simmer and cook for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning on the bottom.

3. When the zucchini are soft, stir in the cooked fish, and the curry is ready to go! Taste it one more time for salt/sugar/acid, adjust if needed, and then serve in comforting bowls of yumminess.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 1 = wowzers (fish flown in from overseas)
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!