Pasta with Cheezy Lentil Sauce: Recipe #230

Everyone here loves pasta. But as delicious as it is, I can get bored making the same tomato sauce, beans, and greens variety all the time. So I keep trying to come up with variations that are interesting and totally yummy, like this cashew-cheezy, hearty-lentilly pasta dish of comfort for any family dinner. It’s inspired by Isa Does It‘s Lentil-a-roni.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours, because if we don’t have a planet to live on, nothing else matters.

Ingredients ($9 for a large pot)

3/4 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight in water for extra creaminess – $1.50
1 1/2 cups cooked brown lentils – $0.69
1 1/2 cups vegetable broth – $0.75
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped – $0.15
1 tsp salt – $0.05
1 tsp oregano, 1 tsp basil – $0.56
Black pepper to taste
28-oz can crushed tomatoes, blended for extra smoothness – $1.59
1 tbsp brown sugar – $0.03
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce (optional) – $0.10
1-2 lbs green and yellow beans – we picked these free from the farm
1 lb of your favorite pasta – $2.99

Directions

1. Prepare your ingredients. Soak the cashews overnight (or for at least 2 hours) in water at room temperature, then drain the water. This will make the cashews soft and easy to blend.

Cook the lentils according to package directions (I would usually use a 3:1 ratio: boil 1 1/2 cups of water for 1/2 cup dry lentils). Wash and trim your green and yellow beans.

Blend the cashews and vegetable broth together in a blender until it’s very smooth with no chunks.

2. Make the sauce. In a large pan over medium high heat, cook the garlic, salt, oregano and basil together in the olive oil for 2-3 minutes until the garlic starts to brown. Next, add the lentils and mix well. Use a fork to mash up some of the lentils.

Add in the blended tomatoes and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Then add in the cashew mixture and keep cooking for 3-5 minutes more until it’s as thick as you like. Taste and adjust for salt/sugar/acid/pepper.

3. While the sauce is cooking, bring a large pot of water to a boil, then add in your pasta. Set a timer according to package directions for how long the pasta will need to boil. When about 7 minutes of cooking time are left on the timer, add the green beans into the water with the pasta.

Drain the pasta and green beans, then pour the sauce over it and give it a good through mixing. Grab yourself a bowl of comforting, nourishing deliciousness!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

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Pasta with Cheezy Lentil Sauce: Recipe #230

maitridojo
A totally yummy, cashew-cheezy, hearty-lentilly pasta dish of comfort for any family dinner.
Cook Time 1 hr
Plus soaking the cashews 1 d
Total Time 1 d 1 hr
Course Main Course
Cuisine Italian
Servings 6

Equipment

  • Blender

Ingredients
  

  • 3/4 cup raw cashews soaked overnight for extra creaminess
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked brown lentils
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 tsp salt plus black pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp basil
  • 28 oz can crushed tomatoes blended for extra smoothness
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce (optional)
  • 1-2 lbs green and yellow beans
  • 1 lb your favorite pasta

Instructions
 

  • Prepare your ingredients. Soak the cashews overnight (or for at least 2 hours) in water at room temperature, then drain the water. This will make the cashews soft and easy to blend.
    Cook the lentils according to package directions (I would usually boil 1 1/2 cups of water for 1/2 cup dry lentils). Wash and trim your green and yellow beans.
    Blend the cashews and vegetable broth together in a blender until it’s very smooth with no chunks.
  • Make the sauce. In a large pan over medium high heat, cook the garlic, salt, oregano and basil together in the olive oil for 2-3 minutes until the garlic starts to brown. Next, add the lentils and mix well. Use a fork to mash up some of the lentils.
    Add in the blended tomatoes and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Then add in the cashew mixture and keep cooking for 3-5 minutes more until it’s as thick as you like. Taste and adjust for salt/sugar/acid.
  • While the sauce is cooking, bring a large pot of water to a boil, then add in your pasta. Set a timer according to package directions for how long the pasta will need to boil. When about 7 minutes of cooking time are left on the timer, add the green beans into the water with the pasta.
    Drain the pasta and green beans, then pour the sauce over it and give it a good through mixing. Grab yourself a bowl of comforting, nourishing deliciousness!

Notes

 
Sustainability Score (explained here)
  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 16/18
If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!
Keyword comfort food, dairy-free, pasta, plant-based

Pizza Bowls: Recipe #228

If you want a break from wheat or dairy, pizza bowls are a beautiful way to enjoy pizza without the bread and cheese. You take a bowl of rice and load it with veggies, plant-based ground meat, and a velvety cashew-tomato sauce that tastes very rich and cheesy. It’s inspired by the legendary Isa.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($16.50 for 4-6 bowls)

Veggies:
2 tbsp olive oil – $0.20
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 package enoki mushrooms or your favorite mushrooms – $2.99
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
One package of your favorite plant-based ground meat – $4.99
1 bunch kale and 1 bunch collard greens, destemmed and chopped – $3.98
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce – $0.10

Sauce:
1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight – $1.00
3 cloves garlic, peeled – $0.11
3 tbsp tomato paste – $0.89
1/2 cup miso ginger broth or other vegetable broth – $0.25
1 lime, juiced – $0.20
1 tsp salt – $0.05

Serve with:
4 cups cooked rice – $0.47
1/2 cup olives – $0.50
2 tbsp fresh chopped basil leaves – free from garden

Directions for Pizza Bowls

0. (Make sure you soaked the cashews in water overnight! Or for at least 2 hours at room temperature.)

1. Start the rice cooking however you normally cook rice, then begin on the veggies. In a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat, then add the onions. Saute for about 5 minutes, stirring often, until they’re soft and starting to brown. Then add in the garlic, mushrooms, and salt, and cook for 3 more minutes.

Next, stir in the ground meat, greens, and Worcestershire sauce, mixing well to combine. Cook for about 3 more minutes until the greens have wilted and everything is melding together nicely. Turn the heat down to low while you get the sauce ready, and remember to stir occasionally.

2. Put all the sauce ingredients in the blender and blend until very smooth. You might need to stop and mix it with a spoon a few times to get it really silky. Taste and adjust for seasonings. If you’re not using it right away, you can keep it in the fridge.

3. Assemble your bowls: I like to put the rice in first, then the veggies and “meat”, then the sauce on top, with olives and basil as final garnishes. Dig into this heavenly bowl of comfort and enjoy your evening! Any leftovers will freeze nicely for future deliciousness.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Sunflower Mac & Cheese (Vegan): Recipe #226

Sunflower seed cheese? Don’t laugh. Even our most fanatical mac & cheese fan was going back for thirds of this ingenious and tasty creation. Paired with green beans and plant-based meatballs, sunflower mac & cheese makes a completely delicious and nutritious dinner. We will definitely be making this one again and again. Thanks once more to the brilliant Isa Does It!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7.50 for a large pot)

1 or 1 1/4 cups raw sunflower seeds, soaked in water overnight – $0.99
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
1/2 cup carrots, sliced thinly – $0.46
1/2 onion, chopped – $0.25
2 tsp salt – $0.10
4 cloves garlic, chopped – $0.15
3 cups vegetable broth – $1.50
2 tbsp cornstarch – $0.20
1/4 cup nutritional yeast – $0.40
2 tbsp tomato paste – $0.22
1 tbsp lemon juice – $0.10
1 pound elbows or small shell pasta – $2.99

Green beans and plant-based meatballs on the side (optional)

Directions for Sunflower Mac & Cheese

1. Cover the sunflower seeds in water and soak overnight at room temperature in a small bowl.

In a medium pot, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Cook the carrots, onions, and salt together for about 10 minutes until soft, then add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute.

Scoop the carrot-onion-garlic mix into your blender and add the sunflower seeds, broth, cornstarch, nutritional yeast, and tomato paste. Blend until it’s very smooth, then transfer it back to your pot.

Cook the sauce for about 15 minutes over medium heat, stirring often, until it’s nice and thick. Add in the lemon juice and adjust salt/pepper as needed.

2. While the sauce is thickening, cook up your plant-based meatballs in a pan and bring a large pot of water to a boil, then cook your pasta with the green beans together (a nifty pro tip!) for however many minutes the pasta package says.

3. Drain the pasta and green beans, then mix in all the sauce to create a thick cheesy delicious dinner. Serve your sunflower mac & cheese hot in bowls with meatballs on the side, if desired. It’s also wonderful as leftovers the next day!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Strawberry Coconut Bread Pudding: Recipe #225

I had never tasted bread pudding before this, and now it’s one of my new favorite treats. This strawberry coconut bread pudding is a plant-based version that uses coconut milk for extra creaminess. It was inspired by a recipe in Isa Does It, a loaf of homemade challah bread, and some extra strawberries we had in the fridge.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7.50 for 9 servings in a 8×8″ pan)

6 cups cubed challah bread – $3
1 cup soy milk – $0.37
1 cup coconut milk – $1.49
3 tbsp cornstarch – $0.30
1/2 cup brown sugar – $0.26
2 tbsp lemon juice – $0.20
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20
2 cups sliced strawberries – $2.49

Glaze:
1 cup icing sugar – $0.88
1 tbsp soy milk – $0.02
1-2 tsp vanilla – $0.20
1 tbsp coconut oil – $0.55

Directions for Strawberry Coconut Bread Pudding

1. Cut up the bread and put it in a large bowl. In a small bowl, mix together the soy milk, coconut milk, cornstarch, brown sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla, then pour this over the bread and mix to coat. Let it sit for 15 minutes to soak in and get all soft and moist. Then mix in the strawberries.

2. Press the mixture into an 8×8″ pan greased with a bit of margarine, then bake at 350F for 30 minutes. The top will be a nice golden brown.

3. In a small bowl, mix the icing sugar, soy milk, vanilla, and coconut oil, then drizzle over the pudding when it has cooled for a few minutes. Serve your strawberry coconut bread pudding warm, and savor each marvelous mouthful! 🙂

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Homemade Poutine (Fries + Plant-Based Gravy + Vegan Cheese): Recipe #224

When I was pregnant in Canada (close to 20 years ago now!) the two things I incredibly enjoyed eating were poutine and veal sandwiches. Poutine is a French-Canadian dish of french fries with cheese curds on top and covered in gravy, so the cheese gets all gooey. It’s hard to imagine until you actually taste it. The plant-based gravy for this homemade poutine is inspired by Sam, and the french fries are from our recipe here.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7 for 4 good servings)

8 Yukon Gold potatoes – $1.44
Water – free
1/4 cup olive oil – $0.40
Salt and pepper to taste

1/4 cup margarine or vegan butter – $0.62
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
2 tbsp flour – $0.02
1 1/2 cups vegetable broth – $0.75
Soy sauce to taste

Your favorite dairy-free cheese (feel free to try different ones!) – $2.99
Basil garnish (optional)

Directions for Homemade Poutine

1. Make the fries according to this recipe, or prepare frozen french fries according to the package if you don’t have 2 hours to spare.

2. Make the gravy: In a large pan over medium high heat, melt the margarine, then stirfry the onion for about 10 minutes until it starts to get nice and golden. Stir in the flour and cook for 1 minute, then slowly pour in the broth while you whisk constantly, so it doesn’t get lumpy. Keep whisking and cooking until it’s nice and thick, then turn off the heat. Add soy sauce to taste, which also gives it a nice rich color.

3. Assemble your homemade poutine: Put your fries in a bowl first, then sprinkle a generous helping of dairy-free cheese, then smother the whole thing in gravy. Add a basil leaf on top for flair if you like, then dig into your comforting bowl of Canadian goodness.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Apricot Plum Cobbler (Plant-Based): Recipe #222

Would you believe I’ve made it through 43 years on this planet without ever making a cobbler? And I don’t remember ever eating one either. What is a cobbler, you say? It’s baked fruit with fresh biscuit dough on top, which sounds spectacular! We had some soft summer fruit to use up, so we adapted a peach raspberry recipe from the fantastic book Isa Does It to make our apricot plum cobbler. Yum!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($10 for one 8×8″ pan = 9 servings)

Fruit filling:
2 cups apricots, quartered – $3.00
2 cups plums, quartered – $3.00
1 nectarine, sliced – $0.99
1 lemon, juiced – $0.20
1/2 cup brown sugar – $0.26
2 tbsp cornstarch – $0.20
2 tbsp flour – $0.02
1/4 tsp salt – $0.01

Biscuit dough:
6 tbsp soy milk – $0.14
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – $0.27
1-1/2 cups white whole wheat flour – $0.26
1-1/2 tsp baking powder – $0.05
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
3 tbsp brown sugar – $0.09
2 tbsp coconut oil – $1.10
2 tbsp margarine – $0.31
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20

Directions for Apricot Plum Cobbler

1. Bake the fruit: Mix all the fruit filling ingredients together and spread out in a greased 8×8″ pan. Cover with foil and bake at 425F for 20 minutes.

While that’s baking, make the biscuit dough: In a small bowl, mix the soy milk and vinegar. Let it sit for a minute or two to curdle. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, salt, and brown sugar together. Add the coconut oil and margarine into the dry ingredients and rub it together with your fingers until it turns into crumbs. Mix the vanilla into the curdled soy milk, then add all the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix into a ball of dough. Separate the dough into 9 even balls.

2. Take the baked fruit out of the oven, remove the foil, and drop the biscuit dough balls on top of the fruit. Bake again, uncovered this time, for another 20 minutes. The biscuits will get golden brown when it’s done, and the fruit mixture will bubble up. Remove the cobbler from the oven.

Use a large spoon to scoop out a whole biscuit and all the fruit underneath it into a bowl. Serve your apricot plum cobbler warm as is or with non-dairy yogurt/ice cream. Enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Mappleberry Muffins: Recipe #221

Apples, blueberries, maple syrup, oats – these mappleberry muffins have all the wholesome goodness of Canada. And no animals were harmed in making them! We polished these off for breakfast over a couple of days. Hope you enjoy them too.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5.50 for 12 muffins)

1 1/4 cup flour – $0.20
2/3 cup whole wheat flour – $0.12
2 1/2 tsp baking powder – $0.04
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
1 cup rolled oats – $0.12
3/4 cup brown sugar – $0.39
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20
1/3 cup maple syrup – $1.43
3/4 cup soy milk – $0.28
1/2 cup almond milk yogurt – $0.67
1/3 cup canola oil – $0.22
1 1/4 cup frozen blueberries – $1.25
1 apple, grated, with skin – $0.29

Directions for Mappleberry Muffins

1. In a large bowl, mix the flours, baking powder, salt, oats, and brown sugar. In a separate small bowl, mix the vanilla, maple syrup, soy milk, yogurt, and canola oil. Add the wet mixture into the dry ingredient bowl and mix just until combined. Then fold in the grated apple and frozen blueberries until they’re evenly distributed. Do not overmix. The batter will turn purple, and that’s ok!

2. Pour the batter into 12 lined muffin cups. Sprinkle a few extra oats on top of each muffin if you like. Bake at 400F for 18-20 minutes until golden on top and a chopstick inserted into a muffin comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack, then enjoy with your morning coffee, tea, or soy milk.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Split Pea Potato Soup: Recipe #220

Sometimes you just want a creamy, comforting soup to soothe your spirit. This split pea potato soup hits the spot and happens to be plant-based too for extra happiness. Hope you enjoy it when you need a warm, loving hug!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($6 for a large pot)

1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
1 onion, chopped – $0.50
4 cloves garlic, chopped – $0.15
1 zucchini, chopped – $0.47
2 tsp rosemary – $0.56
1/2 tsp sage – $0.14
1/2 cup bourbon – $2.40
1 1/2 cups green split peas – $0.99
4 potatoes, peeled and chopped – $0.75
6 1/2 cups water – free (or you could use vegetable broth)
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions for Split Pea Potato Soup

1. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium high heat and add the onion. Cook for about 5 minutes to start to soften the onion, then add in the zucchini, garlic, rosemary, and sage. Cook for another couple of minutes, stirring often.

Add the bourbon and mix well, making sure to scrape any onion bits off the bottom of the pan. Let the alcohol burn off for about 3-4 minutes. Then add in the split peas, potatoes, and water, with about 1 tsp of salt to start.

Bring to a boil, then cover the pot, turn the heat down to medium and cook for about 30 minutes until the potatoes and split peas are soft and tender.

2. Pour the soup into a blender in batches, and return it to a different pot to simmer and stay warm. Puree it until it’s nice and smooth, but a few chunks are ok too if you like the texture. Taste and adjust salt and pepper as needed. Serve warm and get cozy.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Fluffy Twister Bagels: Recipe #205

We’ve tried a number of bagel and soft pretzel recipes now, and this one is by far the best! The flavor that comes through with the overnight rising is unbelievable, and boiling them in honey water instead of baking soda makes it taste legit – just like a bakery in Toronto I used to go to. As soon as we finish eating one batch of twister bagels we start making another one! Thanks to Sally for some key refinements to our previous recipes.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($4 total for 8 twister bagels)

1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tbsp brown sugar – $0.37
1+1/2 cups hottest tap water – free
3 cups white + 1 cup whole wheat flour – $0.64
1 tbsp salt – $0.12
1 tbsp olive oil to coat the rising bowl – $0.10
1/4 cup honey – $0.56
8 cups water – free
Bagel toppings (1 tbsp each sesame seeds and poppy seeds) – $1.40
1 egg, beaten – $0.29

Directions

1. In a small plastic (non-metal) bowl, mix the yeast and brown sugar, then add the hottest tap water. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes to form a foam over the surface. In a separate, larger bowl, mix the flours and salt.

Add the yeast mixture to the flour and stir with a wooden spoon until it comes together. Use your hands to knead it for about 7-10 minutes. Rub the olive oil around the larger bowl, then add the dough ball to it. Cover and let rise in the fridge overnight. It will about double in size.

2. In the morning, take the dough out from the fridge and let it rest at room temperature for 45 minutes before working with it.

Punch the dough down and cut it into 16 equal parts, then roll out each part into a thin rope about 6″ long. Pinch two ropes together at one end and then twist them around each other. After twisting the whole length of the ropes, pinch to join the two ends together in a circle to make a twisted bagel shape. See the pictures below to help you out.

Repeat for all the pieces of dough until you get 8 twisted bagels. Let the bagels rest while you prepare the water bath.

3. Heat the 8 cups water and honey in a large pot until it boils. Turn the heat down to simmering (medium or medium-high) and gently place a few bagels in at a time. They will float to the top. If they don’t, gently loosen them from the bottom of the pot with a spatula. Cook for 1 minute, then flip them over and cook for 1 minute more. 

Brush the boiled twister bagels with the beaten egg, then dip them in a bowl of mixed sesame and poppy seeds if desired. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet.

Bake at 425F for 10 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for 10 more minutes. They will be a nice deep golden brown. Cool on the baking sheet for about 15 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to finish cooling. Enjoy fresh with a salad or with your favorite sandwich fillings, or store in the freezer for eating later!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Comfort Food Week: Recipes That Give You a Warm Hug

This week I’ve pulled out some of our comfiest recipes for when you need to whip up some good, old-fashioned, homemade comfort food.

I’d love to hear about your favorite recipes too!

Wishing you love and peace in your day today.

#1: Breakfast Quiche

A savory breakfast is a nice change around here. This quiche with mushrooms, peppers, spinach, and feta cheese would be good any time of day though. Inspired by an Esalen recipe, it’s a flexible pastry and egg dish that can work nicely with a variety of your favorite meats, cheese, or veggies. Feel free to adapt to your taste!

#2. Thai Peanut Soba Veggie Bowl

This is a very comforting dish of soba noodles, tofu, and cabbage with a creamy gingery Thai peanut sauce. I would eat this any day of the week, and we all went back for a healthy second bowl.

#3. German Cabbage Rolls

If you’re looking for comfort food in Germany or Russia, you might come across this dish of cabbage, beef, rice, onions, and tomato. I know it from the Mennonite tradition in Canada, as the first dish Tim’s grandmother made for me. It is also fantastic as leftovers, so I make a big tray and it lasts for at least 3 dinners.

#4. Cauliflower Tikka Masala

We love the creamy curry-ness of a good chicken tikka, but now we’re eating more of a plant-based diet. What to do? Fortunately Jamie Oliver came to the rescue with the inspiration for this cauliflower tikka masala recipe. Very comforting comfort food, and healthy to boot.

#5. Pasta Amatriciana with Pepperoni & Garbanzos

Everyone goes back for seconds on this dish! It’s pasta covered in a rich tomato sauce, with chopped up bits of garlic, pepperoni, and garbanzo beans, all topped with pecorino romano cheese. Super easy and quick to make too. It’s a great weeknight dinner to whip up.

#6. Lentils with Spinach & Sausages

This is a tasty and nutritious Italian peasant dish, which you can serve for lunch or dinner with pasta or fresh bread. I used chicken sausages, fresh chopped spinach, and the secret ingredient to any lentil soup – celery! 

#7. British Shepherd’s Pie

I had nannies from England when I was little, and some of the things they taught us were traditional British recipes. Shepherd’s pie, bubble and squeak, bangers and mash, Yorkshire pudding – all the classics. We all love a good shepherd’s pie here. I cook up a big casserole every few weeks and it lasts for 2-3 dinners.

#8. Leek and Olive Pizza with Whole Wheat Crust

Imagine a pizza you might have at a self-care retreat on the coast of France – loaded with caramelized onions and leeks, mozzarella, and kalamata olives on a nourishing, partly whole wheat crust. That’s what this sumptuous dinner is, and I hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

#9. Fudgiest Plant-Based Brownies

Some days you just need a good fudgy brownie to hit the spot. This recipe is made without dairy or eggs, and is arguably more satisfying than a traditional non-vegan brownie – everyone here gobbles these up with gusto. It’s also super quick to throw together for a serious chocolate emergency.

Many blessings from our home to yours for a wonderful weekend and week ahead. Please feel free to forward this to a friend who might enjoy some comforting treats today.

Happy cooking!
Maitri Alexandra 🙂