Chocolate Chip Banana Peanut Butter Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes: Recipe #215

It’s a mouthful of words and a mouthful of wonderful taste sensations. We made these “chocolate chip banana peanut butter oatmeal cookie pancakes” one weekend for a celebration we were having, and everyone wanted more. You can’t really go wrong with chocolate, banana, peanut butter, and oatmeal. And they’re dairy-free! Thanks to Dana and John for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($4 for about 8-10 thick pancakes)

2 bananas, mashed – $0.38
2 tsp baking powder – $0.05
2 eggs – $0.58
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
2 tsp vanilla – $0.40
2 tbsp peanut butter – $0.30
2 tbsp melted coconut or canola oil – $1.10
6 tbsp soy milk – $0.15
1 cup oats – $0.12
1/2 cup whole wheat flour – $0.10
1/2 cup non-dairy chocolate chips – $0.50

Margarine or cooking spray, maple syrup (optional)

Directions for Chocolate Chip Banana Peanut Butter Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes!

1. Make the batter: in a medium bowl, mix the mashed bananas with the baking powder. Next, add in the eggs, peanut butter, oil, and soy milk. Mix to combine, then stir in the oats, whole wheat flour, and chocolate chips. Stir together just until there are no clumps of flour left.

Let the batter sit and rest for about 10 minutes while you get the griddle ready.

2. Heat the griddle to about 350F, or a frying pan to medium heat. Spread a little bit of margarine or cooking spray over the surface to prevent sticking if you like, then pour about 1/4 cup of batter onto the griddle for each pancake.

Cook for 2-4 minutes on each side until they’re nice and golden, flipping them with a flapjack when the first side is cooked.

3. Serve hot with fresh maple syrup or any other pancake toppings you like! They’re also fantastic to eat as they are. If you have any leftovers, they will keep well in the fridge for 2-3 days or in the freezer for longer. Enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Homemade Waffles with Berries: Recipe #207

Here’s another favorite recipe to make with fresh berries. Waffles originated in Belgium and are now enjoyed around the world. The process is not that different from making pancakes, but you’ll need a waffle attachment for your griddle, or a waffle maker. Homemade waffles are a wonderful weekend treat!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($7 for 8 waffles plus toppings)

2 eggs – $0.58
2 cups soy milk – $0.74
1/4 cup canola oil – $0.19
1/2 tsp vanilla – $0.10
1 tbsp brown sugar – $0.03
1 cup white flour + 1 cup whole wheat flour – $0.32
4 tsp baking powder – $0.06
1/4 tsp salt – $0.03
Canola oil spray for the waffle iron – $0.15

1/2 cup fresh blueberries or strawberries – $2.00
Tub of non-dairy whipped cream – $2.99

Directions for Homemade Waffles

1. In a large bowl, beat the eggs until they’re light and frothy. Add in the soy milk, 1/4 cup canola oil, vanilla, brown sugar, flours, baking powder, and salt. Mix just until smooth. Wash all the berries and slice the strawberries.

2. Preheat your waffle iron to about 350F and spray both sides with the canola oil spray. Spoon the waffle batter into one side of the griddle, filling each one up just until the mold is covered. Close the lid so the top of the mold closes down over the batter, and cook for about 5 minutes. You’ll know they’re ready when you can lift the top up gently and the waffles are golden brown and fall away from the mold.

Serve your homemade waffles hot with fresh berries and (if desired) non-dairy whipped topping and/or maple syrup. Yummy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Easy Deviled Eggs: #175 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Deviled eggs originated in Italy, with the word “deviled” being used to mean spicy or with zest. This version of the recipe isn’t too spicy, so it’s a friendly finger food for kids of all ages. Thanks to Tim for making them for us. 🙂

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($3 total for 16 deviled eggs)

8 eggs – $2.24
1 tsp dijon mustard – $0.08
2 tbsp mayonnaise – $0.20
1/2 tsp garlic powder – $0.14
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 tsp paprika for sprinkling on top – $0.14

Directions

1. Hard boil the eggs: in a medium pot, cover the eggs with cold water and put them on the stove set to high. When the top of the water starts to get disturbed from boiling, set a timer for 8 minutes. Turn the temperature down slightly so it’s going at a gently rolling boil, not too crazy. When the timer goes off, drain the hot water and fill the pot with cold water to cool the eggs. Peel the shells off when the eggs are cool enough to handle.

2. Prepare the white bowls and yolk filling: cut each egg in half lengthwise, and use a spoon to gently scoop out the yolk from each egg half. Try not to break the egg whites as you’re doing this. Arrange the whites on a plate, and mash up the yolks with the mustard, mayo, garlic powder, salt and pepper.

3. Decorate the eggs: scoop the yolk mixture into a piping bag with a ridged metal tip if you like patterns, and squeeze some yolk mixture into each egg white bowl. The yolk should stand up tall, well above the egg white. Sprinkle with paprika if you like. Serve room temperature or cold from the fridge. Store any leftovers in an airtight container to eat the next day.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you amazing cooks tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Sunday Brunch Quiche: #99 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

A savory breakfast is a nice change around here. This quiche with mushrooms, peppers, spinach, and feta cheese would be good any time of day though. Inspired by an Esalen recipe, it’s a flexible pastry and egg dish that can work nicely with a variety of your favorite meats, cheese, or veggies. Feel free to adapt to your taste!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($13 total)

FOR THE CRUST:
1 3/4 cups flour – $0.28
2 tsp oregano – $0.56
8 tbsp butter, cut into small chunks – $1.24
6 tbsp cold water – free
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10

FOR THE FILLING:
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
1 onion, thinly sliced – $0.50
4 cloves garlic, minced – $0.15
1 red pepper, diced – $0.99
1 (8 oz) package crimini mushrooms, quartered – $2.49
2 cups baby spinach – $1.99
1 tsp sage – $0.28
1 tsp oregano – $0.28
4 eggs – $1.16
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
1/2 cup + 1 tbsp milk – $0.20
1/4 pound crumbled feta cheese – $2.69

Directions

1. Make the crust: In a large bowl, mix the flour and oregano. Add the butter and rub with your fingers until it turns crumbly. Then add the water and gently knead it to form a ball. 

Refrigerate for 15 minutes to solidify, then gently roll out or press the dough into a 9-inch baking dish or pie pan.

Brush the pastry with olive oil to prevent a soggy-bottomed pie. Cover with parchment and dry beans to pre-cook the crust at 400F for 10 minutes. Then remove from the oven and take off the beans and parchment.

2. Make the filling: in a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat and add the onions and garlic. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently until it gets soft and translucent.

Add the red pepper, mushrooms, oregano, and sage. Cook for 5-10 minutes more until most of the liquid that comes out of the mushrooms has evaporated. Add the spinach and let it wilt down.

3. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs, salt, and milk until well combined. 

Add half of the veggie mix to the pie shell, followed by the feta cheese and half of the egg mix. Then add the rest of the veggies and the rest of the egg.

Bake at 375F for 45 minutes. Test for done-ness by sticking a knife in the middle of the quiche and checking that it comes out clean. 

Cool for 15 minutes, then cut and serve warm. Top with extra feta cheese if desired. Quiche is excellent as leftovers the next day too. Yum!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

English Muffins (from scratch): #73 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

My husband requested and helped with this fun English muffin project. I didn’t know that you cook them on a griddle like pancakes before they go in the oven! The whole thing only took about 2 hours, which is quick for home-baked bread.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5 total)

1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
3 tbsp honey – $0.42
1/4 cup hottest tap water – free
1 3/4 cups milk – $0.66
1 egg – $0.29
4 tbsp butter, melted – $0.62
5 cups white whole wheat flour – $0.88
1 1/2 tsp salt – $0.08
1 cup almond flour for dusting – $1.26

Directions

1. In a large bowl, mix the yeast, 1 tbsp honey, and water. Stir gently and let it sit for 5 minutes to form a thick foam. Add the remaining 2 tbsp honey, milk, egg, and melted butter, and whisk together. Then add the flour and salt, and mix with a wooden spoon for about 5 minutes until the sticky dough comes together. Cover and rise in a warm place for 1 hour until doubled in size.

2. Using just enough flour to be able to handle the sticky dough, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut it in half, then cut each half into 8 equal pieces. Roll each piece gently in your hands into a ball, then flatten the ball into an English muffin shape. Put the 16 rounds onto 2 almond flour-dusted parchment-lined baking sheets, then sprinkle more almond flour over the top. Cover and rise again for 1 hour until doubled in size.

3. Set your griddle to medium heat, then carefully lift the rounds with a spatula onto the griddle. Cook for about 2-3 minutes on each side until nicely browned. Put the rounds back on the baking sheet and bake at 325F for about 12 minutes. Cool on a wire rack and cut open to toast and eat with your favorite toppings. These freeze well if you don’t eat them all up.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings:  3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 2 = decent meal
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely 
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Mushroom Avocado Cheese Omelets With Bacon: #43 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

I only know two ways of cooking eggs: scrambled and hard-boiled. Fortunately, my husband is a more accomplished egg chef than I am. He can whip together an amazing stuffed omelet for a weekend breakfast, while making it look super easy. Feel free to put whatever toppings you like inside, as long as they’re pre-cooked and not too wet.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($10 total)

6 eggs (for 2 omelets) – $1.75
1 package enoki or your favorite mushrooms – $2.99
1 ripe avocado – $1.29
1/2 package bacon, cooked and diced – $2.75
1/2 cup havarti or other cheese, chopped up – $0.97
2 tbsp butter – $0.31
1 tbsp olive oil – $0.10
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Prepare your fillings: I heated up the olive oil in a small pan over medium high heat, then dropped the mushrooms into the hot oil and added salt and pepper. Stirring frequently, they take about 5-7 minutes to cook to a point of being browned and not watery. I also chopped up the avocado, bacon, and cheese.

2. Then the egg chef took over. Heat the butter in a large pan over medium heat, beat 3 eggs together in a bowl, then when the butter is hot, pour the eggs into the pan. As the bottom of the omelet solidifies, keep going around with a fork – lifting the side of the omelet and tilting the pan towards the fork to let the liquid egg on top run underneath. You should end up with a fairly dry top after a couple of minutes of this.

3. Make sure the omelet can slide around the pan by shaking the pan gently side to side, then arrange your toppings over the top however you like.

Slide the omelet off the pan into your plate, and as you’re halfway through the slide, use the pan to flip the top of the omelet over onto the bottom half that’s already on the plate. These omelets were so big that we cut each one in half and shared them.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 14/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Omelette Aux Fines Herbes: #14 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

A straight up French omelette can make a delicious breakfast, lunch, dinner, or snack. Super simple once you get the technique down. All you need is a few eggs, a little butter or oil, and whatever herbs and spices you have on hand. Enjoy!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($3.00 total)

6 eggs (up to 4 of them can be just egg whites) – $1.75
1/4 cup chopped fresh herbs (I used chives) – $0.90
2 tbsp butter of canola oil – $0.31
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. In a small bowl, use a fork (not a whisk, because that will introduce too much air) to mix the eggs, salt and pepper. Stir in the chopped herbs.

2. In a large pan, heat the butter or oil over pretty high heat. When it’s hot, add the egg mix and shake the pan around for about 2 minutes until the egg is mostly solidified, then let it cook for 10 seconds to create a nice skin underneath. An alternate technique is to keep lifting the sides of the omelet all the way around so the egg liquid on top runs underneath.

3. Once it’s still a bit wet on top but has a nice brown color underneath, you have the option to add cheese or other toppings (or just leave it plain and simple), then use a spatula or fancy pan-flipping work to fold half of the omelet over the other half.

Serve hot, with your favorite bready side.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings:  1 = <4 servings
  • Cost per person (prices based on Trader Joe’s/Costco): 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If you tried it, please let me know how it came out for you. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!