Plant-Based Cinnamon Rolls: Recipe #243

These warm, gooey, plant-based cinnamon rolls disappeared very quickly at our house. Even better that they don’t have dairy or eggs to cause our bodies and our planet suffering. Hope you enjoy them! Thanks to Dana and John for inspiration.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($3.50 for a pan of 9 rolls)

Dough:
1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.15
1 tbsp brown sugar – $0.03
1/4 cup hottest tap water – free
2 cups flour – $0.32
1 cup whole wheat flour – $0.16
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
3 tbsp + 3 tbsp + 2 tbsp Earth balance margarine – $1.24
1 cup vanilla soy milk – $0.37

Filling:
1/2 tbsp cinnamon – $0.09
1/4 cup brown sugar – $0.13

Icing:
1 cup powdered sugar – $0.88
1 tbsp soy milk – $0.02

Directions for Plant-Based Cinnamon Rolls

1. In a small non-metal bowl, mix the yeast, 1 tbsp sugar and hottest tap water. Let it sit for 5 minutes to form a thick foam on top. In a large metal bowl, mix the flours and salt.

When the yeast is ready, add it to the flour mixture along with 3 tbsp softened margarine and 1 cup soy milk. Bring it together into a ball and knead it for a couple of minutes.

Cover with cling wrap and leave it to rise in a warm place for 1 hour to double in size.

2. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough into a long rectangle-ish shape. Brush with 2 tbsp melted margarine, then sprinkle the cinnamon and 1/4 cup brown sugar evenly over the surface.

Roll it up tightly with the long side facing you, rolling it away from you to make a nice spiraled log. Slice it up into 9 pieces and put them into a greased 8″ glass baking dish.

Cover with cling wrap and let it rise in a warm place for 1/2 an hour.

3. In a small bowl, mix the powdered sugar with 1 tbsp soy milk. Bake the cinnamon rolls at 350F for 25 minutes. Let them cool for a few minutes, then drizzle with the icing and cut them up to enjoy warm from the oven. So good!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Chocolate Raspberry Brioche Buns: Recipe #240

These are bites of pure heaven. Chocolate raspberry brioche buns are clouds of fluffy bread stuffed with a single raspberry and a square of chocolate that melt together as they bake. You bite into one and a burst of flavor comes through the soft pillowy brioche. Magical.

We decided to bake instead of fry these, and to put chocolate + raspberry together instead of separating them.

Which brings up a great insight about how to make decisions. If you’re stuck on something, take a moment to sit quietly, be with your breath, and feel your body. Allow yourself to be present with whatever emotions or sensations come up.

Trust that you already know what to do, and trust the decision to reveal itself. It doesn’t have to be the “right” decision. Just pick something, go with it, and learn.

Thanks to Paul for this recipe’s inspiration and to all of you for being part of our delicious, mindful, planet-saving family!

Ingredients ($6.50 for 18 filled buns)

1 tbsp active dry yeast – $0.50
1 tsp brown sugar – $0.01
1/3 cup hot soy milk (heat for 30 seconds in the microwave to reach 140F) – $0.12
1 1/2 cup white flour – $0.24
1/2 cup white whole wheat flour – $0.09
2 tbsp brown sugar – $0.06
3/4 tsp salt – $0.03
2 eggs – $0.58
Knead 10 minutes
1/2 cup Miyoko’s vegan butter, softened – $1.24
Knead 5 minutes
Fridge O/N
16 raspberries – $2.50
16 small-ish chunks of dark chocolate – $1.00
Rise 15 minutes warm place
Soy wash
Bake 350 20 mins

Directions for Chocolate Raspberry Brioche Buns

1. In a small, non-metal bowl, mix the yeast, 1 tsp brown sugar, and warmed soy milk. Stir gently to combine and let it sit for 5 minutes to form a thick foam on top of the liquid.

In a large metal bowl, mix together the flours, 2 tbsp brown sugar, and salt. Mix the eggs into the yeast mixture, then pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Stir with a wooden spoon until it comes together into a ball, then knead by hand for 10 minutes until it’s nice and smooth.

Next, add the vegan butter, squish it in with your hands and enjoy the magnificent sound, then knead for 5 more minutes. It will be lovely and soft, and it’s ok if it’s a bit sticky.

Put the dough into a plastic bowl, cover, and refrigerate overnight.

2. The next morning, put the dough on a lightly floured board and knead it a few times to get the air out. Use a sharp knife to cut it into 18 equal-sized pieces and shape each one into a ball.

Wash and dry your raspberries, and prepare your chocolate chunks. Flatten each ball into a disc, put a chocolate-stuffed raspberry in the middle, and fold the dough up around the raspberry. Pinch the dough together and gently roll it back into a ball, with the surprise nicely tucked inside. Repeat for each of the 18 balls.

Put the stuffed balls on a parchment-lined baking sheet, cover with cling wrap or a damp tea towel, and let them rise in a warm place for 15 minutes.

3. When the buns have doubled in size, brush them with some extra soy milk, then bake at 350F for 16-20 minutes until they’re nice and golden brown.

Cool for a few minutes, then serve your chocolate raspberry brioche buns warm, with plant-based whipped cream and dusted with icing sugar if you like. Celebrate your decision to make these delicious treats! ❀️

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 1 = >3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 15/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Maple Apple Butter: Recipe #223

This is a sweet apple topping for your favorite ice cream that comes from the Canadian Museum of Nature in honor of Canada Day, and summer, and apples. Maple apple butter is also great to eat on its own, like a thick applesauce. Next time you have some extra apples lying around, give it a try!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($3.50 for 4 good servings)

4 apples, chopped up – $1.20
3 tbsp margarine – $0.47
1/2 cup water – free
1/2 cup maple syrup – $1.90
1/4 tsp cinnamon – $0.07

Non-dairy vanilla ice cream to serve (optional)

Directions for Maple Apple Butter

1. Put the chopped apples, margarine, and water in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then cook for 5 minutes on medium high after it starts to boil, stirring occasionally. Then drop the heat to medium low and add the maple syrup and cinnamon. Let it simmer for about 10 minutes until the apples are very tender. Give it a good stir every couple of minutes.

2. When the apples are very nice and soft, pour everything from the pot into a glass blender and puree it until it’s really nice and smooth. Serve warm or cold over your favorite ice cream, or eat it as is for a lovely thick applesauce treat.

Sustainability ScoreΒ (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 2 = 4-6 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Apricot Plum Cobbler (Plant-Based): Recipe #222

Would you believe I’ve made it through 43 years on this planet without ever making a cobbler? And I don’t remember ever eating one either. What is a cobbler, you say? It’s baked fruit with fresh biscuit dough on top, which sounds spectacular! We had some soft summer fruit to use up, so we adapted a peach raspberry recipe from the fantastic book Isa Does It to make our apricot plum cobbler. Yum!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($10 for one 8×8″ pan = 9 servings)

Fruit filling:
2 cups apricots, quartered – $3.00
2 cups plums, quartered – $3.00
1 nectarine, sliced – $0.99
1 lemon, juiced – $0.20
1/2 cup brown sugar – $0.26
2 tbsp cornstarch – $0.20
2 tbsp flour – $0.02
1/4 tsp salt – $0.01

Biscuit dough:
6 tbsp soy milk – $0.14
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – $0.27
1-1/2 cups white whole wheat flour – $0.26
1-1/2 tsp baking powder – $0.05
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
3 tbsp brown sugar – $0.09
2 tbsp coconut oil – $1.10
2 tbsp margarine – $0.31
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20

Directions for Apricot Plum Cobbler

1. Bake the fruit: Mix all the fruit filling ingredients together and spread out in a greased 8×8″ pan. Cover with foil and bake at 425F for 20 minutes.

While that’s baking, make the biscuit dough: In a small bowl, mix the soy milk and vinegar. Let it sit for a minute or two to curdle. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, salt, and brown sugar together. Add the coconut oil and margarine into the dry ingredients and rub it together with your fingers until it turns into crumbs. Mix the vanilla into the curdled soy milk, then add all the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix into a ball of dough. Separate the dough into 9 even balls.

2. Take the baked fruit out of the oven, remove the foil, and drop the biscuit dough balls on top of the fruit. Bake again, uncovered this time, for another 20 minutes. The biscuits will get golden brown when it’s done, and the fruit mixture will bubble up. Remove the cobbler from the oven.

Use a large spoon to scoop out a whole biscuit and all the fruit underneath it into a bowl. Serve your apricot plum cobbler warm as is or with non-dairy yogurt/ice cream. Enjoy!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Mappleberry Muffins: Recipe #221

Apples, blueberries, maple syrup, oats – these mappleberry muffins have all the wholesome goodness of Canada. And no animals were harmed in making them! We polished these off for breakfast over a couple of days. Hope you enjoy them too.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5.50 for 12 muffins)

1 1/4 cup flour – $0.20
2/3 cup whole wheat flour – $0.12
2 1/2 tsp baking powder – $0.04
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
1 cup rolled oats – $0.12
3/4 cup brown sugar – $0.39
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20
1/3 cup maple syrup – $1.43
3/4 cup soy milk – $0.28
1/2 cup almond milk yogurt – $0.67
1/3 cup canola oil – $0.22
1 1/4 cup frozen blueberries – $1.25
1 apple, grated, with skin – $0.29

Directions for Mappleberry Muffins

1. In a large bowl, mix the flours, baking powder, salt, oats, and brown sugar. In a separate small bowl, mix the vanilla, maple syrup, soy milk, yogurt, and canola oil. Add the wet mixture into the dry ingredient bowl and mix just until combined. Then fold in the grated apple and frozen blueberries until they’re evenly distributed. Do not overmix. The batter will turn purple, and that’s ok!

2. Pour the batter into 12 lined muffin cups. Sprinkle a few extra oats on top of each muffin if you like. Bake at 400F for 18-20 minutes until golden on top and a chopstick inserted into a muffin comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack, then enjoy with your morning coffee, tea, or soy milk.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 18/18

If any of you lovely readers tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Raw Plant-Based Brownies (with Decadent Frosting!) : Recipe #217

If you’re looking for a brownie that’s incredibly satisfying and chocolatey, has no wheat or dairy, and doesn’t require baking, look no further! These fudgy morsels can be thrown together in 15 minutes and will be devoured in about the same amount of time if you don’t hide some of them for later! Thanks to Dana and John for inspiring these raw plant-based brownies.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($12 for one 8×8″ pan)

Brownie base:
8 oz package dates, soaked then mashed – $4.99
1 cup raw walnuts, ground up in blender – $2.00
1 cup raw almonds, ground up in blender – $2.00
3/4 cup cocoa – $0.83
1/4 tsp salt – $0.01
1/4 cup maple syrup – $0.95

Frosting:
1/4 cup soy milk – $0.09
1 cup chocolate chips – $1.00

Directions for Raw Plant-Based Brownies

1. In a small bowl, soak the dates in the hottest tap water you can muster. After about 10 minutes, they should be nice and soft and you can drain them and mash them up with a fork.

In a larger bowl, mix together the ground up walnuts and almonds, cocoa, and salt. Then add the mashed up dates and maple syrup. Get in there with your hands and squish it all up together until it comes together into a ball of deliciousness. It’s very messy and fun. Press it evenly into a parchment-lined 8×8″ baking dish. Brownie base done!

2. To make the frosting, pour the soy milk into a microwaveable bowl and put it in the microwave on high for about 45 seconds. Add in the chocolate chips, let them sit in the warm milk for 2 minutes to soften, then stir them in until it’s a rich, smooth, glossy, thick frosting.

3. Pour the frosting over the brownies and spread it out evenly. That’s it!

Cut into your raw plant-based brownies: try some of them warm and gooey, then cover the rest and put them in the fridge. They will firm up nicely in about an hour, and are just as good the next day too.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy=ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Black Forest Cupcakes (Very Fudgy!): Recipe #212

The normal chocolate-cherry combination typical of German black forest cake isn’t my favorite flavor medley, but with apricots and the extreme fudginess of this recipe, I could eat these black forest cupcakes all day long! It’s a modification of our chocolate zucchini cake recipe, only fudgier. Hope you enjoy this decadent and healthy plant-based treat. πŸ™‚

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($8 for 12 cupcakes and 24 mini cupcakes)

Cupcake batter:
1 cups white flour – $0.16
2 cup whole wheat flour – $0.32
3/4 cup cocoa – $0.83
2 tsp baking powder – $0.03
1/2 tsp baking soda – $0.01
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
3/4 cup brown sugar – $0.39
1 1/4 cup dark chocolate chunks – $1.25
1 cup soy milk – $0.28
3/4 cup canola oil – $0.56
3 eggs – $0.87
1 tbsp vanilla – $1.00
2 cups grated zucchini – $1.40

Icing:
2 tbsp apricot jam – $0.16
1 tbsp soy milk – $0.02
1/2 cup icing sugar – $0.44

Directions for Black Forest Cupcakes

1. Make the batter base: In a large bowl, mix the flours, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, salt, brown sugar, and chocolate chips. Stir to combine. Add in the soy milk, canola oil, eggs, and vanilla and mix well.

Grate and add the zucchini to the chocolate batter, and fold it in with a spatula until the zucchini is evenly distributed throughout the batter.

2. Pour the batter into cupcake tins lined with cupcake wrappers – we filled 3 tins to make 12 large cupcakes and 24 mini cupcakes. Bake at 350F for 20 mins (large cupcakes) and then 9 mins (mini cupcakes).

Make the icing by mixing together all the ingredients for that, adding more icing sugar if you want it thicker.

3. Cool on a wire rack and enjoy your black forest cupcakes just as they are, drizzled with icing, or topped with non-dairy ice cream!

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Paqa’s Scottish Scones: Recipe #211

My mom used to make these for breakfast on weekends, but you could whip a batch up for a British tea time too. They’re delicate little Scottish scones that you break in half and load up with berries and whipped cream. Definitely best eaten when they’re warm. Each bite is like a dream.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($2 for about 18 scones)

2 cups flour – $0.32
1 tbsp baking powder – $0.03
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
1/2 cup cold margarine – $1.24
2/3 cup soy milk – $0.25

Directions for Scottish Scones

1. In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Quickly cut the cold margarine in with a knife until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Then stir in the soy milk quickly with a fork and mix until the dough follows the fork around the bowl.

2. On a lightly floured surface, turn out the dough and knead it quickly about 8-10 times, handling it gently. Pat the dough out to 1/2″ thickness and cut circles out with a 2″ round cutter or glass, using a straight-down-then-twist motion. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet, setting them apart for crusty biscuits or close together with the sides touching for softer ones.

3. Bake at 450F for 12-15 minutes until they start to separate in the middle and are lightly golden. Serve hot from the oven with dairy-free whipped cream, your favorite berries, or just some jam or honey.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness: 3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 2 = healthy-ish
  • TOTAL: 17/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Moist Carrot Cake (Dairy-Free): #196 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

We had a bunch of extra carrots in our farm box and decided to turn them into a cake. If you like carrot cake, this one is moist and dairy-free! It also pairs nicely with the cream cheese frosting recipe from our chocolate zucchini bundt cake post.

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5 total for a Bundt cake)

2 cups brown sugar – $1.04
1 cup canola oil – $0.75
4 eggs – $1.16
1 tsp vanilla – $0.20
1 cup flour – $0.16
1 cup whole wheat flour – $0.16
1 tsp baking powder – $0.01
1 tsp baking soda – $0.01
1 tsp ground cinnamon – $0.28
1/2 tsp salt – $0.03
2 cups grated carrots – $0.92
Margarine or oil for greasing the loaf pan

Directions

1. In a small bowl, mix together the brown sugar, canola oil, eggs, and vanilla. Beat well with a fork or whisk. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Stir well to combine.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ones and mix until just combined with no flour lumps.

2. Fold in the grated carrots with a spatula, taking care to not overmix the batter. Pour into a greased bundt pan.

3. Bake at 350F for 45-50 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then loosen the edges with a knife and flip it out onto a wire rack to finish cooling. Frost with cream cheese icing if you like or enjoy as is.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 2 = 1-3 hours
  • Servings: 3 = lots of leftovers
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  2 = decent meal (polarized because I’m not a cinnamon fan)
  • Environmental impact: 2 = moderate impact
  • Nutritional value: 1 = eat rarely (sugar)
  • TOTAL: 13/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!

Pina Colada Smoothies: #194 of 1000 Sustainable Food Experiments

Here are some kid-friendly pineapple-coconut-strawberry smoothies guaranteed to put a smile in your day. Adults can always add some rum to make it more like the real thing if you like. It’s just like a day at the beach. Well, almost. Aloha!

This is part of our 1,000 Food Experiments to create sustainable meals for our family and hopefully yours.

Ingredients ($5 total for 2 smoothies)

1 cup frozen pineapple chunks – $1.66
4 pitted dates – $0.83
1 cup coconut milk – $1.49
3 fresh strawberries, plus some for decoration – $1.00

Directions

1. Put all the ingredients in a blender. Blend until mostly smooth, then serve in fancy glasses with strawberries over the side of the glass. Enjoy in your most tropical state of mind.

Sustainability Score (explained here)

  • Time to make: 3 = <1 hour
  • Servings: 1 = <4 servings
  • Cost per serving: 3 = <$5
  • Deliciousness:  3 = when are we having this again?
  • Environmental impact: 3 = minimal damage
  • Nutritional value: 3 = optimal nutrition
  • TOTAL: 16/18

If any of you amazing home chefs tried it, or have other recipes you’d like us to experiment with, please let me know. Wishing you and your family a healthy, happy day!